The Epistle to the Hebrews: Sixteen Lectures given by Samuel Ridout

Irving Risch
1
Free sample

 Publisher’s Introductory


Back in the eighteen and early nineteen hundreds there were a group of men known as the Plymouth Brethren. These men had many writings and many of them were taken from Lectures given in many areas and at different times during this era. Some were given in different languages and then translated into English.



I have taken many of these writings and messages and formatted them so they could be read on tablets and phones. In other words, they are in epub and mobi formats. I have set up indexes with headers and have enabled text to speech. I then run them through a checker to make sure the ebook format is without errors. In doing this I have produced a high quality product for a very low price. These are not just scanning of old writings but have been completely redone by hand.



I started doing this for my own private use. I found there were others who wanted them also so after praying about it and contacting publishers who already got permission to use all these writings and lectures I too got permission via email. (which I have on file).


I now have over 230 of these writings in ebook format on Amazon for the Kindle and on Google play for the Android OS. Hopefully this number will keep increasing as time goes on.

Prefatory Note

There is no introduction to the Epistle to the Hebrews, and little need for any preface here. Where Christ is the absorbing theme, everything must yield to Him, and explanations are out of place.

The main themes of the book are the person of Christ, His priesthood and sacrifice, and the place into which He has introduced His people. Everything is measured by these standards, and loyalty to Him is the crucial test for all that would claim attention.

In these closing days of the Church's history, where there is a strong tendency back into that which apes Judaism, a carnal religion without divine power, and where the person of our Lord is lightly esteemed, if not absolutely degraded, it is to be hoped that this little book will serve to call back the thoughts of His people to One who is worthy of all their attention, allegiance, and worship.

May the Lord graciously use it solely to the glory of His own peerless Name! S. Ridout.

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About the author

 For Biographical Notes see:

http://www.plymouthbrethren.org/article/2504

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Additional Information

Publisher
Irving Risch
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Published on
Apr 18, 2015
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Pages
445
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Language
English
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Genres
Religion / Christian Church / General
Religion / Christianity / General
Religion / General
Religion / Spirituality
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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 Publisher’s Introductory


Back in the eighteen and early nineteen hundreds there were a group of men known as the Plymouth Brethren. These men had many writings and many of them were taken from Lectures given in many areas and at different times during this era. Some were given in different languages and then translated into English.



I have taken many of these writings and messages and formatted them so they could be read on tablets and phones. In other words, they are in epub and mobi formats. I have set up indexes with headers and have enabled text to speech. I then run them through a checker to make sure the ebook format is without errors. In doing this I have produced a high quality product for a very low price. These are not just scanning of old writings but have been completely redone by hand.



I started doing this for my own private use. I found there were others who wanted them also so after praying about it and contacting publishers who already got permission to use all these writings and lectures I too got permission via email. (which I have on file).


I now have over 230 of these writings in ebook format on Amazon for the Kindle and on Google play for the Android OS. Hopefully this number will keep increasing as time goes on.

Introductory Note

The following pages are an endeavor to set forth, with some degree of fulness, the typical teachings of the Tabernacle. They embody therefore not only what it is hoped will be suggestive for more advanced students, but the elements, familiar to many, which are needed to give anything like a complete survey.

Being in lecture form, there is more or less of the colloquial style, which it is hoped will make the book more easily read. The writer makes no apology for what may be called the devotional tone — how can we fail to be stirred with such a theme?

Setting forth as it does the person and work of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Tabernacle occupies typically the centre of all doctrinal truth, as it did literally the centre of Israel's camp. It is necessary therefore that in anything like a full examination of its meaning there should be a full discussion of those great doctrines which it typifies. This will explain the good measure of detail in the treatment of those doctrines. In days when they are being so largely denied, this is surely not out of place.

Thanks are due to Mr. John Bloore for his excellent illustrations of the tabernacle and its furniture; made especially for this work, and in which great care has been taken to follow the exact text of Scripture. [Omitted from this digital edition, it is hope that links will be made to good quality sketches.]

That the Lord will bless this effort to set forth the glories of His beloved Son, is the prayer of the writer.

 Preliminary Remarks

To many, a handbook on such a subject may seem needless, and an intrusion into what must ever be left to the individual alone as guided by the Spirit of God. Others, already diligent workers in this field, will find, perhaps, little to help; but it is hoped that large numbers of the Lord's people who have a longing to become better acquainted with the contents of His word may find useful suggestions in the following pages.

A few preliminary remarks may not be amiss.

First. No method of Bible study, however useful in itself and suggestive, can do away with the absolute necessity for repentance and new birth. The natural mind is "alienated from the life of God," and no amount of education, even in the word of truth itself, can change the character of that which is "enmity against God." The Sunday-school teacher must never forget this as he faces a class of bright, intelligent young people, week by week. If they have not been brought to repentance toward God and faith toward our Lord Jesus Christ, the great work has not even been begun which is to form the foundation of their whole life. Well would it be for all who are seeking to make plain the word of God, to remember this, and with all the enthusiasm that they bring to the opening up of this wonderful storehouse of divine riches, to agonize in prayer for the conversion of those who, in the providence of God, have been committed to them.

The same, of course, applies to all who come to the Scriptures without having a knowledge of God in the forgiveness of their sins. While we can never refuse such any help which we may be able to give them, let us ever remember that "one thing is needful." It is to be feared that this is overlooked in much of the activity in Bible study of the day, and without doubt the rise and growth of the higher criticism may largely be due to the handling of the Scriptures by unconverted men in a coldly intellectual manner. No doubt, much of the mixture in established churches is due to the indiscriminate participation, by converted and unconverted alike, in truths which can only really be spiritually learned.

Second. Similarly, no method of Bible study, even for the children of God, can be substituted for the inestimable blessedness and guidance of the Holy Spirit in the believer. "He will guide you into all truth" is a promise not only for the apostles, a pledge of infallible inspiration for whatever God had to give to His Church in the way of a written Word through them, but in a more general sense, the Spirit is an enlightener of the minds of the saints, leading them into that which is needed for their upbuilding on their most holy faith.

The most complete and logical methods of Bible study, pursued in the most diligent manner,with approved helps of every variety, are all worthless apart from the special and controlling guidance of Him who delights to take of the things of Christ and to show them unto us. How indispensably precious a privilege it is to have the Author of the perfect and infinite word of God present with us, not merely to point out its manifold beauties and perfections, and to give us the key to its arrangement, and lead us on step by step in a knowledge of the vast plan contained in it, but to have this divine Person dwelling in us! — our hearts through grace capable of appreciating what He makes known, and of assimilating the truths of those deep things which the Spirit searcheth, and of carrying them out in obedient lives. Here, as in all else, "the manifestation of the Spirit is given to every man to profit withal," and "we have received not the spirit of the world, but the Spirit which is of God, that we might know the things that are freely given to us of God."

We would pause here and lay down our pen if we thought that one word of what follows would divert the mind of the child of God from the glorious fact of the Spirit's presence and dwelling in him, competent to lead, direct, correct and control through an understanding of that Word which He himself has inspired.

Let us at the very outset of what may be said, remember this, — give Him room for the exercise of that activity of grace in which He so delights. The communion of the Holy Ghost is that fellowship with the Father and His Son which He produces, a fellowship one with another, too, which is founded upon the assimilation of the word of God; for it would be the greatest mistake to put the Spirit's enlightenment in opposition to the written Word. The Scriptures are indeed the instrument of the Holy Spirit. All the truth that He unfolds is revealed truth already recorded in the word of God. We may be sure that if ever any are tempted to think of receiving revelations from the Spirit apart from the Scriptures, they are in grave peril.

We find in the very types given of the Spirit and His work that His ministry is in and through the word of God — both vivifying and cleansing the heart. Thus, "Except a man be born of water and of the Spirit he cannot enter into the kingdom of God" shows that the water of the Word (seeEph. 5:26) is the instrument used by the Spirit of God. "Being born again, not of corruptible seed, but of incorruptible, by the word of God, which liveth and abideth forever." Thus it is by the word of God ministered to the soul by the Spirit of God that man is born anew.

It is this fact which encourages us to go on instructing children and others in the word of God. It might be said that until a person is converted he cannot rightly understand Scripture, and therefore it were needless to trouble ourselves to impart it to them. But we never know when the Spirit of God may work, and indeed the very exercise on our part in imparting the knowledge of the word of God to others should encourage us to believe that the Spirit of truth is already at work in their hearts. The teaching of the Bible to unconverted children has been likened to laying the paper and wood all ready for kindling a fire. There is no fire in the paper or the wood, and yet they are necessary: so a knowledge of Scripture, in some measure at least, either by hearing the gospel or reading it, is necessary for the conversion of souls.

Third. In line with what has already been said, it is well to remember that all our study of the Bible must be in a reverent spirit in which all self-sufficiency and dependence upon carnal wisdom are refused, and we realize that if we are to know anything aright it must be from God alone. "The word of God and prayer" are put together as the sanctifying power in the enjoyment of all the natural gifts of God (1 Tim. 4:5). Thus the Scripture will always, if rightly apprehended, reveal our ignorance and shortcomings to us, leading us to a spirit of prayer; and in like manner our very ignorance of God's word will turn us to Him who is so ready to fulfil His word: "If any of you lack wisdom, let him ask of God, that giveth to all men liberally and upbraideth not; and it shall be given him" (James 1:5).

This, however, must suffice here. Later on in our little book we may point out the place of prayer in connection with the study of the Bible.

We turn now to the immediate subject.

 The following pages, begun several years ago, and now, in the mercy of God, completed, are an effort to give a brief series of notes upon the first book of Samuel. The title, "King Saul: the man after the flesh," shows us the central figure of the book, a type too of the fleshly condition of the nation as a whole.

The lessons connected with the rise, reign and end of King Saul are many, and all point to the utter unprofitableness of the flesh in its greatest excellence to be aught that is acceptable to God.

The subject in one sense is a depressing one, and the proper effect should be to turn us from the contemplation of the man after the flesh to the man after God's own heart, David, who comes upon the scene in the latter part of the book and shows the contrast between faith and nature. As a type of Christ, he is the antidote to the baleful example and influence of poor Saul, and thus shows how God would ever lead, even through the knowledge of sin in ourselves and of the evil about us, not to occupation with that, but with Him who is the Deliverer of His people. May the Lord use this effort to trace the workings of the flesh and the triumphs of His grace to the blessing of His people!

A word of explanation may not be out of place as to the character of Jonathan spoken of in the body of the book. The matter is one of great delicacy, and the writer shrinks from taking the edge off any wholesome lessons that have been connected with the character and position of Jonathan, but would only call attention to what is said in the body of the book and leave each reader free to draw his own conclusions.

 Publisher’s Introductory


Back in the eighteen and early nineteen hundreds there were a group of men known as the Plymouth Brethren. These men had many writings and many of them were taken from Lectures given in many areas and at different times during this era. Some were given in different languages and then translated into English.



I have taken many of these writings and messages and formatted them so they could be read on tablets and phones. In other words, they are in epub and mobi formats. I have set up indexes with headers and have enabled text to speech. I then run them through a checker to make sure the ebook format is without errors. In doing this I have produced a high quality product for a very low price. These are not just scanning of old writings but have been completely redone by hand.



I started doing this for my own private use. I found there were others who wanted them also so after praying about it and contacting publishers who already got permission to use all these writings and lectures I too got permission via email. (which I have on file).


I now have over 230 of these writings in ebook format on Amazon for the Kindle and on Google play for the Android OS. Hopefully this number will keep increasing as time goes on.

Introductory Note

The following pages are an endeavor to set forth, with some degree of fulness, the typical teachings of the Tabernacle. They embody therefore not only what it is hoped will be suggestive for more advanced students, but the elements, familiar to many, which are needed to give anything like a complete survey.

Being in lecture form, there is more or less of the colloquial style, which it is hoped will make the book more easily read. The writer makes no apology for what may be called the devotional tone — how can we fail to be stirred with such a theme?

Setting forth as it does the person and work of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Tabernacle occupies typically the centre of all doctrinal truth, as it did literally the centre of Israel's camp. It is necessary therefore that in anything like a full examination of its meaning there should be a full discussion of those great doctrines which it typifies. This will explain the good measure of detail in the treatment of those doctrines. In days when they are being so largely denied, this is surely not out of place.

Thanks are due to Mr. John Bloore for his excellent illustrations of the tabernacle and its furniture; made especially for this work, and in which great care has been taken to follow the exact text of Scripture. [Omitted from this digital edition, it is hope that links will be made to good quality sketches.]

That the Lord will bless this effort to set forth the glories of His beloved Son, is the prayer of the writer.

 Preliminary Remarks

To many, a handbook on such a subject may seem needless, and an intrusion into what must ever be left to the individual alone as guided by the Spirit of God. Others, already diligent workers in this field, will find, perhaps, little to help; but it is hoped that large numbers of the Lord's people who have a longing to become better acquainted with the contents of His word may find useful suggestions in the following pages.

A few preliminary remarks may not be amiss.

First. No method of Bible study, however useful in itself and suggestive, can do away with the absolute necessity for repentance and new birth. The natural mind is "alienated from the life of God," and no amount of education, even in the word of truth itself, can change the character of that which is "enmity against God." The Sunday-school teacher must never forget this as he faces a class of bright, intelligent young people, week by week. If they have not been brought to repentance toward God and faith toward our Lord Jesus Christ, the great work has not even been begun which is to form the foundation of their whole life. Well would it be for all who are seeking to make plain the word of God, to remember this, and with all the enthusiasm that they bring to the opening up of this wonderful storehouse of divine riches, to agonize in prayer for the conversion of those who, in the providence of God, have been committed to them.

The same, of course, applies to all who come to the Scriptures without having a knowledge of God in the forgiveness of their sins. While we can never refuse such any help which we may be able to give them, let us ever remember that "one thing is needful." It is to be feared that this is overlooked in much of the activity in Bible study of the day, and without doubt the rise and growth of the higher criticism may largely be due to the handling of the Scriptures by unconverted men in a coldly intellectual manner. No doubt, much of the mixture in established churches is due to the indiscriminate participation, by converted and unconverted alike, in truths which can only really be spiritually learned.

Second. Similarly, no method of Bible study, even for the children of God, can be substituted for the inestimable blessedness and guidance of the Holy Spirit in the believer. "He will guide you into all truth" is a promise not only for the apostles, a pledge of infallible inspiration for whatever God had to give to His Church in the way of a written Word through them, but in a more general sense, the Spirit is an enlightener of the minds of the saints, leading them into that which is needed for their upbuilding on their most holy faith.

The most complete and logical methods of Bible study, pursued in the most diligent manner,with approved helps of every variety, are all worthless apart from the special and controlling guidance of Him who delights to take of the things of Christ and to show them unto us. How indispensably precious a privilege it is to have the Author of the perfect and infinite word of God present with us, not merely to point out its manifold beauties and perfections, and to give us the key to its arrangement, and lead us on step by step in a knowledge of the vast plan contained in it, but to have this divine Person dwelling in us! — our hearts through grace capable of appreciating what He makes known, and of assimilating the truths of those deep things which the Spirit searcheth, and of carrying them out in obedient lives. Here, as in all else, "the manifestation of the Spirit is given to every man to profit withal," and "we have received not the spirit of the world, but the Spirit which is of God, that we might know the things that are freely given to us of God."

We would pause here and lay down our pen if we thought that one word of what follows would divert the mind of the child of God from the glorious fact of the Spirit's presence and dwelling in him, competent to lead, direct, correct and control through an understanding of that Word which He himself has inspired.

Let us at the very outset of what may be said, remember this, — give Him room for the exercise of that activity of grace in which He so delights. The communion of the Holy Ghost is that fellowship with the Father and His Son which He produces, a fellowship one with another, too, which is founded upon the assimilation of the word of God; for it would be the greatest mistake to put the Spirit's enlightenment in opposition to the written Word. The Scriptures are indeed the instrument of the Holy Spirit. All the truth that He unfolds is revealed truth already recorded in the word of God. We may be sure that if ever any are tempted to think of receiving revelations from the Spirit apart from the Scriptures, they are in grave peril.

We find in the very types given of the Spirit and His work that His ministry is in and through the word of God — both vivifying and cleansing the heart. Thus, "Except a man be born of water and of the Spirit he cannot enter into the kingdom of God" shows that the water of the Word (seeEph. 5:26) is the instrument used by the Spirit of God. "Being born again, not of corruptible seed, but of incorruptible, by the word of God, which liveth and abideth forever." Thus it is by the word of God ministered to the soul by the Spirit of God that man is born anew.

It is this fact which encourages us to go on instructing children and others in the word of God. It might be said that until a person is converted he cannot rightly understand Scripture, and therefore it were needless to trouble ourselves to impart it to them. But we never know when the Spirit of God may work, and indeed the very exercise on our part in imparting the knowledge of the word of God to others should encourage us to believe that the Spirit of truth is already at work in their hearts. The teaching of the Bible to unconverted children has been likened to laying the paper and wood all ready for kindling a fire. There is no fire in the paper or the wood, and yet they are necessary: so a knowledge of Scripture, in some measure at least, either by hearing the gospel or reading it, is necessary for the conversion of souls.

Third. In line with what has already been said, it is well to remember that all our study of the Bible must be in a reverent spirit in which all self-sufficiency and dependence upon carnal wisdom are refused, and we realize that if we are to know anything aright it must be from God alone. "The word of God and prayer" are put together as the sanctifying power in the enjoyment of all the natural gifts of God (1 Tim. 4:5). Thus the Scripture will always, if rightly apprehended, reveal our ignorance and shortcomings to us, leading us to a spirit of prayer; and in like manner our very ignorance of God's word will turn us to Him who is so ready to fulfil His word: "If any of you lack wisdom, let him ask of God, that giveth to all men liberally and upbraideth not; and it shall be given him" (James 1:5).

This, however, must suffice here. Later on in our little book we may point out the place of prayer in connection with the study of the Bible.

We turn now to the immediate subject.

 Publisher’s Introductory


Back in the eighteen and early nineteen hundreds there were a group of men known as the Plymouth Brethren. These men had many writings and many of them were taken from Lectures given in many areas and at different times during this era. Some were given in different languages and then translated into English.



I have taken many of these writings and messages and formatted them so they could be read on tablets and phones. In other words, they are in epub and mobi formats. I have set up indexes with headers and have enabled text to speech. I then run them through a checker to make sure the ebook format is without errors. In doing this I have produced a high quality product for a very low price. These are not just scanning of old writings but have been completely redone by hand.



I started doing this for my own private use. I found there were others who wanted them also so after praying about it and contacting publishers who already got permission to use all these writings and lectures I too got permission via email. (which I have on file).


I now have over 230 of these writings in ebook format on Amazon for the Kindle and on Google play for the Android OS. Hopefully this number will keep increasing as time goes on.

Contents.

Lecture 1.
The Holy Spirit in the Dispensations — Before Christ; the Present Age; the Millennium
Lecture 2.
The Holy Spirit in Salvation — Conviction; Regeneration; Sealing; Assurance
Lecture 3.
The Holy Spirit in Sanctification — Indwelling; Communion; Anointing; Prayer; The Walk in the Spirit.
Lecture 4.
The Holy Spirit in the Church — Baptism of the Spirit; Unity of the Spirit; Gifts of the Spirit; Worship by the Spirit.
Lecture 5.
The Holy Spirit for Power — Filled with the Spirit; Confession; Boldness; Guidance; Ministry
Lecture 6.
The Holy Spirit and the Scriptures — Inspiration; Enlightenment; Prophecy.
Lecture 7.
The Holy Spirit and Christ — Before His Incarnation; During His Earthly Life; the Present Dispensation; the Coming of the Lord.

 "God, who at sundry times and in divers manners spake in time past unto the fathers by the prophets, hath in these last days spoken unto us by His Son." Hebrews 1:1.

God has been speaking from the beginning. Creation itself is an expression of His thought, and all His providential government — where there are eyes to see — gives witness to His eternal power and Godhead, so that men are without excuse. In a special way, He has spoken through the prophetic ministry of His servants during the entire period covered by the Old Testament. These Old Testament Scriptures give us the record and manner of God's speaking in time past. The instruments He used were the prophets, but the Author is God.

But there is a change in the Gospels — the Son Himself has come, and is speaking. "In these last days" — an expression significant of a change from His former methods of appealing to man, as well as a declaration that no further unfolding remains to be revealed — "He hath spoken unto us by His Son," or to be absolutely literal, "in a Son." This does not suggest that there are other sons, but gives the great fact of His Son standing out all alone. There is but One; no need even to designate Him in any exclusive way.

The expression shows us that God's manner of communication has changed. It is not merely that we have inspired and authoritative messengers who declare unto us the will of God in many parts and in many ways — in details of biography, in historic events, in types, etc. but God Himself is present in the Son.

 The following pages, begun several years ago, and now, in the mercy of God, completed, are an effort to give a brief series of notes upon the first book of Samuel. The title, "King Saul: the man after the flesh," shows us the central figure of the book, a type too of the fleshly condition of the nation as a whole.

The lessons connected with the rise, reign and end of King Saul are many, and all point to the utter unprofitableness of the flesh in its greatest excellence to be aught that is acceptable to God.

The subject in one sense is a depressing one, and the proper effect should be to turn us from the contemplation of the man after the flesh to the man after God's own heart, David, who comes upon the scene in the latter part of the book and shows the contrast between faith and nature. As a type of Christ, he is the antidote to the baleful example and influence of poor Saul, and thus shows how God would ever lead, even through the knowledge of sin in ourselves and of the evil about us, not to occupation with that, but with Him who is the Deliverer of His people. May the Lord use this effort to trace the workings of the flesh and the triumphs of His grace to the blessing of His people!

A word of explanation may not be out of place as to the character of Jonathan spoken of in the body of the book. The matter is one of great delicacy, and the writer shrinks from taking the edge off any wholesome lessons that have been connected with the character and position of Jonathan, but would only call attention to what is said in the body of the book and leave each reader free to draw his own conclusions.

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