Sandor Ferenczi - Ernest Jones: Letters 1911-1933

Karnac Books
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The Ferenczi-Jones correspondence presented here is an important document of the early history of psychoanalysis. It spans more than two decades, and addresses many of the relevant issues of the psychoanalytic movement between 1911-1933, such as Freud's relation to Stekel, Adler and Jung; the First World Wa;, the debates of the 1920s regarding the theoretical and technical ideas of Rank and Ferenczi; problems of leadership, structure, and finding a centre for the psychoanalytical movement; as well as issues related to telepathy and lay analysis. It includes thirty-seven letters and six postcards, as well as original documents waiting to be found for eight decades; these belong to the 'private', personal history of psychoanalysis and help to decode diverse aspects of the experience preserved in these documentary memories of former generations.Perhaps the most interesting aspect of this correspondence is how it allows us to build up a far more nuanced picture of the development of an extraordinary relationship between Ferenczi and Jones. It could hardly be termed harmonious, and was not devoid of rivalry and jealousy, sometimes even of hidden passion and outright hostility. Nevertheless, friendship, sympathy, collegiality and readiness for cooperation were just as important for Ferenczi and Jones as rivalry, mistrust and suspicion. This volume celebrates the 100th anniversary of the foundation in 1913 of both the British and the Hungarian Psychoanalytical Societies.
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About the author

Sandor Ferenczi (7 July 1873 - 22 May 1933) was a Hungarian psychoanalyst, a key theorist of the psychoanalytic school and a close associate of Sigmund Freud whod latter wrote that Ferenczi made "all analysts his students", a fitting tribute to a towering figure of psychoanalysis. In 1910, at Freud's suggestion, Ferenczi proposed the founding of the International Psychoanalytic Association, and in 1913 founded the Hungarian Psychoanalytic Society. In 1916 he underwent a brief personal analysis with Freud, and in 1918 was elected president of the International Psychoanalytic Society. Ferenczi's early contributions to psychoanalysis have been so fully assimilated that their origin is often forgotten, although his later writings, which were more speculative and deviated from Freudian orthodoxy, have been less widely accepted. He is acknowledged to have been a gifted therapist. He proposed a number of innovations in technique including at first these centered on the so-called "active" technique, while his later study of reactions of disappointment and mistrust that the child suffers in his relationship with his parents inspired a few of his pupils, notably Alice Balint (1949), to investigate early parent-child relationships.

Ferenc Eros studied psychology and literature at the ELTE University in Budapest. He is Professor of Social Psychology at the Faculty of Humanities of the University of Pecs, where he is director of a doctoral programme in psychoanalytic studies since 1997. The focus of his present research areas include the social and cultural history of psychoanalysis in Central Europe, psychoanalytic theory and its application to social issues, the problem of trauma and cultural memory. He edited the Hungarian translation of the Freud-Ferenczi correspondence and founded 'Thalassa', the journal of the Sandor Ferenczi Society in Budapest, which he edited from 1990-2010. At present, he edits 'Imago Budapest', the journal of the Hungarian Imago Association.

Ken Robinson is a psychoanalyst in private practice in Newcastle upon Tyne and the Honorary Archivist for the British Psychoanalytical Society. He is a training analyst for trainings in child,adolescent and adult psychotherapy in the North of England and in Scotland. He lectures and teaches in the UK and Europe, and is especially interested in the developmental point of view, the nature of therapeutic action, and the history of psychoanalysis. His most recent publication is a brief history of the British Psychoanalytical Society.

Judit Szekacs-Weisz is a bilingual psychoanalyst and psychotherapist, a member of the British and the Hungarian Psychoanalytical Society. Born and educated (mostly) in Budapest, she has absorbed the ideas and way of thinking of Ferenczi, the Balints, Hermann, and Rajka as integral parts of a "professional mother tongue". She is author of several articles, and co-editor of 'Lost Childhood and the Language of Exile'. Together with Tom Keve she co-edited 'Ferenczi and His World' and 'Ferenczi for Our Time'.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Karnac Books
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Published on
Jun 1, 2013
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Pages
224
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ISBN
9781781812280
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Language
English
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Genres
Psychology / General
Psychology / Movements / Psychoanalysis
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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Man and His Symbols owes its existence to one of Jung's own dreams. The great psychologist dreamed that his work was understood by a wide public, rather than just by psychiatrists, and therefore he agreed to write and edit this fascinating book. Here, Jung examines the full world of the unconscious, whose language he believed to be the symbols constantly revealed in dreams. Convinced that dreams offer practical advice, sent from the unconscious to the conscious self, Jung felt that self-understanding would lead to a full and productive life. Thus, the reader will gain new insights into himself from this thoughtful volume, which also illustrates symbols throughout history. Completed just before his death by Jung and his associates, it is clearly addressed to the general reader.

Praise for Man and His Symbols

“This book, which was the last piece of work undertaken by Jung before his death in 1961, provides a unique opportunity to assess his contribution to the life and thought of our time, for it was also his firsat attempt to present his life-work in psychology to a non-technical public. . . . What emerges with great clarity from the book is that Jung has done immense service both to psychology as a science and to our general understanding of man in society, by insisting that imaginative life must be taken seriously in its own right, as the most distinctive characteristic of human beings.”—Guardian

“Straighforward to read and rich in suggestion.”—John Barkham, Saturday Review Syndicate

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