Algeria and Transatlantic Relations

Brookings Institution Press
Free sample

The purpose of this volume is first and foremost to introduce Algeria to a new audience, from its long-ago origins to present day. The goal was to intrigue the audience in the United States to look at the untapped potential for cooperation that Algeria offers in a multitude of sectors. The volume begins with an account of Algeria's history, from its origins, islamization, period under the Ottoman and Roman empires, colonization, independence, through today. It then continues with analysis on Algeria's economy, its energy, agricultural, business, and education sectors, development, and relationship with the United States. This volume will serve as a milestone in the growing of transatlantic cooperation between Algeria and the United States.
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About the author

Sasha Toperich is the Senior Executive Vice President of the Transatlantic Leadership Network. Previously, he was Director of the Mediterranean Basin Initiative at Johns Hopkins SAIS Center for Transatlantic Relations. He is the co-editor on multiple volumes concerning the future of transatlantic relations and countries around the Mediterranean.

Samy Boukaila is President and Managing Director of BKL Industries. Boukaila was a founding member and President of Algeria's first think tank, Cercle d'Action et de Reflexion Autour de l'Entreprise (CARE). Under his chairmanship, CARE has partnered with the International Finance Corporation, the US State Department, and the African Development Bank to raise awareness on specific topics related to improving corporate governance and the business climate in Algeria.

Jonathan Roberts is a Research Fellow and Project Manager at the Transatlantic Leadership Network. He is also a Fellow at the World Youth Leadership Network and the Mediterranean Development Initiative. His research has focused on international relations in developing francophone countries.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Brookings Institution Press
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Published on
Jan 29, 2019
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Pages
386
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ISBN
9780960012701
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Language
English
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Genres
Business & Economics / Development / Economic Development
History / Africa / North
Political Science / World / African
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Reassessing the developing world through the lens of Europe's past

Today’s developing nations emerged from the rubble of the Second World War. Only a handful of these countries have subsequently attained a level of prosperity and security comparable to that of the advanced industrial world. The implication is clear: those who study the developing world in order to learn how development can be achieved lack the data to do so.

In The Development Dilemma, Robert Bates responds to this challenge by turning to history, focusing on England and France. By the end of the eighteenth century, England stood poised to enter “the great transformation.” France by contrast verged on state failure, and life and property were insecure. Probing the histories of these countries, Bates uncovers a powerful tension between prosperity and security: both may be necessary for development, he argues, but efforts to achieve the one threaten the achievement of the other. A fundamental tension pervades the political economy of development.

Bates also argues that while the creation of a central hierarchy—a state—may be necessary to the achievement of development, it is not sufficient. What matters is how the power of the state is used. France and England teach us that in some settings the seizure and redistribution of wealth—not its safeguarding and fostering—is a winning political strategy. These countries also suggest the features that mark those settings—features that appear in nations throughout the developing world.

Returning to the present, Bates applies these insights to the world today. Drawing on fieldwork in Zambia and Kenya, and data from around the globe, he demonstrates how the past can help us to understand the performance of nations in today’s developing world.

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-- Arthur B. Laffer and Stephen Moore

When Arthur B. Laffer spearheaded the theory of supply-side economics and became a member of President Reagan's Economic Policy Advisory Board, he took his place as an economic icon. More recently, he joined with Stephen Moore and Peter J. Tanous to write The End of Prosperity -- a clarion call delineating what is wrong with current political approaches to America's present economic challenges. Steve Forbes himself described The End of Prosperity as "brilliantly insightful," saying "READ IT -- AND ACT!"

Now Arthur Laffer and Stephen Moore follow the rousing success of The End of Prosperity with a book even more vital to America and Americans, delivering a plan that shows how our country can regain its lost prosperity. With the economy flat on its back, unemployment at a twenty-five-year high, and the housing default crisis still worsening, is this even possible? But America can once again become the land of economic opportunity, and this brilliant new book tells us exactly how.

While President George W. Bush and President Barack Obama may hail from different parties, their response to the crisis has been strikingly similar. The Bush-Obama plan is a failure that has produced nothing except a cascade of trillions of dollars of debt. Is the situation hopeless?

No, say Arthur Laffer and Stephen Moore resoundingly, the situation is not hopeless. A return to prosperity is still entirely possible...if the correct strategies are followed. In The End of Prosperity, the authors primarily discussed how lower taxes are essential to economic growth. Now, in Return to Prosperity, they detail the other essential components: putting government at all levels on a low-fat diet; emphasizing debt reduction and retirement; and bringing back the investor class in America, where every American can "own a piece of the rock."

In a time where most of the proposed solutions are fraught with peril, the argument provides a refreshing counterbalance. The Return to Prosperity is a prescription that gives America the fundamental tools it needs in order to set about recovery. This book is an urgently needed road map to renewed prosperity, and it is vital reading for anyone who worries that the current economy is faltering, with no clear plan articulated for recovery.
An unforgettable firsthand account of a people's response to genocide and what it tells us about humanity.

This remarkable debut book chronicles what has happened in Rwanda and neighboring states since 1994, when the Rwandan government called on everyone in the Hutu majority to murder everyone in the Tutsi minority. Though the killing was low-tech--largely by machete--it was carried out at shocking speed: some 800,000 people were exterminated in a hundred days. A Tutsi pastor, in a letter to his church president, a Hutu, used the chilling phrase that gives Philip Gourevitch his title.

With keen dramatic intensity, Gourevitch frames the genesis and horror of Rwanda's "genocidal logic" in the anguish of its aftermath: the mass displacements, the temptations of revenge and the quest for justice, the impossibly crowded prisons and refugee camps. Through intimate portraits of Rwandans in all walks of life, he focuses on the psychological and political challenges of survival and on how the new leaders of postcolonial Africa went to war in the Congo when resurgent genocidal forces threatened to overrun central Africa.

Can a country composed largely of perpetrators and victims create a cohesive national society? This moving contribution to the literature of witness tells us much about the struggle everywhere to forge sane, habitable political orders, and about the stubbornness of the human spirit in a world of extremity.

We Wish to Inform You That Tomorrow We Will Be Killed with Our Families is the winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award for Nonfiction.

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