This Common Ground: Seasons on an Organic Farm

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In the tradition of Michael Pollan, Joan Gussow, and Verlyn Klinkenborg's The Rural Life, This Common Ground is an inspirational evocation of a life lived close to the earth, written by the head farmer at one of the country's first community-supported farms. By reflecting on four seasons of activity at his beloved Quail Hill Farm in eastern Long Island, Scott Chaskey offers stirring insight into the connections between land and the human family. Whether writing about the voice of a small wren nesting in the lemon balm or a meadow of oats, millet, and peas rising to silver and green after a fresh rain, this poet-farmer's contagious sense of wonder brings us back to our bond with the soil.
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About the author

Scott Chaskey earned an M.A. in creative writing from Antioch College. For the last fourteen years, he has worked as a land steward and farmer for the Peconic Land Trust at Quail Hill Farm in Amagansett, New York. A pioneer of the community farming movement, he is the president of the Northeast Organic Farming Association and on the board for the Center for Whole Communities in Vermont.

On the web: http://www.peconiclandtrust.org, http://www.wholecommunities.org

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Additional Information

Publisher
Penguin
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Published on
May 2, 2006
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Pages
224
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ISBN
9781101118177
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Features
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Personal Memoirs
Nature / Natural Resources
Nature / Weather
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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