The Quants: How a New Breed of Math Whizzes Conquered Wall Street and Nearly Destroyed It

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With the immediacy of today’s NASDAQ close and the timeless power of a Greek tragedy, The Quants is at once a masterpiece of explanatory journalism, a gripping tale of ambition and hubris, and an ominous warning about Wall Street’s future. 

In March of 2006, four of the world’s richest men sipped champagne in an opulent New York hotel. They were preparing to compete in a poker tournament with million-dollar stakes, but those numbers meant nothing to them. They were accustomed to risking billions.  
 
On that night, these four men and their cohorts were the new kings of Wall Street.  Muller, Griffin, Asness, and Weinstein were among the best and brightest of a new breed, the quants. Over the prior twenty years, this species of math whiz--technocrats who make billions not with gut calls or fundamental analysis but with formulas and high-speed computers--had usurped the testosterone-fueled, kill-or-be-killed risk-takers who’d long been the alpha males the world’s largest casino. The quants helped create a digitized money-trading machine that could shift billions around the globe with the click of a mouse. Few realized, though, that in creating this unprecedented machine, men like Muller, Griffin, Asness and Weinstein had sowed the seeds for history’s greatest financial disaster.  
 
Drawing on unprecedented access to these four number-crunching titans, The Quants tells the inside story of what they thought and felt in the days and weeks when they helplessly watched much of their net worth vaporize--and wondered just how their mind-bending formulas and genius-level IQ’s had led them so wrong, so fast. 
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About the author

SCOTT PATTERSON is author of the New York Times bestselling book The Quants and Dark Pools and a staff reporter for The Wall Street Journal. His work has also appeared in the New York Times, Rolling Stone and Mother Earth News. He has a masters of arts degree from James Madison University. He lives in Alexandria, Virginia.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Crown Business
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Published on
Feb 2, 2010
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Pages
352
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ISBN
9780307453396
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Language
English
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Genres
Business & Economics / Economic History
Business & Economics / Finance / General
History / United States / 21st Century
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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