Letters from the War: The Civil War Letters of a Union Sergeant from the Front to His Home in Walton, New York, and Related Letters, 1862-1864

Gegensatz Press
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Twenty-seven letters written home by Union enlisted men in the American Civil War, with maps and annotations.

 

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Additional Information

Publisher
Gegensatz Press
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Published on
Apr 11, 2016
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Pages
64
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ISBN
9781621307525
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Military
History / United States / Civil War Period (1850-1877)
History / United States / State & Local / Middle Atlantic (DC, DE, MD, NJ, NY, PA)
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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