Neue Gedanken - neues Gehirn: Die Wissenschaft der Neuroplastizität beweist, wie unser Bewusstsein das Gehirn verändert - Vorwort von Daniel Goleman

Arkana
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Naturwissenschaft am Wendepunkt: Die Grundlagen der Gehirnphysiologie müssen neu definiert werden.

Lange Zeit hielt man das Gehirn des Menschen für unveränderlich – vergleichbar der Hardware eines Computers. Inzwischen sprechen viele wissenschaftliche Erkenntnisse dagegen. Damit nähert sich die Wissenschaft des Nervensystems dem spirituellen Weltbild des Ostens, das davon ausgeht, dass der Geist die Materie beherrscht. Die Implikationen dessen, was Wissenschaftler heute als „Neuroplastizität“ bezeichnen, sind revolutionär. Die renommierte Wissenschaftsjournalistin Sharon Begley beschreibt hier die spannende Entwicklung der Neurowissenschaften, die durch Zusammenarbeit mit Meditationsmeistern herauszufinden versuchen, wie und in welchem Maße Gedanken und Emotionen unser Gehirn beeinflussen. Buddhistische Erfahrungen belegen: Wir können Depression in Freude verwandeln und Aggression in Mitgefühl. Das heißt: Wir sind nicht Opfer unserer Gene, sondern selbst verantwortlich für unser Denken und Fühlen.

• Eindrucksvolle Bestätigung buddhistischer Bewusstseins- und Meditationserfahrungen.
• Hervorragender Wissenschaftsjournalismus: Die atemberaubenden Konsequenzen der „Neuroplastizität“.

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About the author

Sharon Begley hat sich als Wissenschaftsjournalistin einen Namen gemacht. Sie war viele Jahre Wissenschaftsredakteurin, erst bei der Zeitschrift "Newsweek", später beim beim "Wall Street Journal".

Burkhard Hickisch ist Ernährungsexperte, Bestsellerautor und Musiker. Seit 2008 hat er maßgeblich zur Verbreitung des grünen Smoothies im deutschsprachigen Gebiet beigetragen. Zusammen mit dem Wiener Arzt Dr. med. Christian Guth hat er den Gesundheitsratgeber zu den grünen Smoothies verfasst, der 2012 bei GU erschien und die Ernährungsinnovation einem breitem Publikum bekannt macht. Als gefragter Ernährungsexperte hält er Vorträge und gibt Workshops zum Thema „Lebendige Nahrung und kraftvolle Lebensweise“.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Arkana
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Published on
Jan 26, 2009
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Pages
512
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ISBN
9783641012670
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Language
German
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Genres
Body, Mind & Spirit / Spiritualism
Psychology / Applied Psychology
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Sharon Begley
Is it really possible to change the structure and function of the brain, and in so doing alter how we think and feel? The answer is a resounding yes. In late 2004, leading Western scientists joined the Dalai Lama at his home in Dharamsala, India, to address this very question–and in the process brought about a revolution in our understanding of the human mind. In this fascinating and far-reaching book, Wall Street Journal science writer Sharon Begley reports on how cutting-edge science and the ancient wisdom of Buddhism have come together to show how we all have the power to literally change our brains by changing our minds. These findings hold exciting implications for personal transformation.

For decades, the conventional wisdom of neuroscience held that the hardware of the brain is fixed and immutable–that we are stuck with what we were born with. As Begley shows, however, recent pioneering experiments in neuroplasticity, a new science that investigates whether and how the brain can undergo wholesale change, reveal that the brain is capable not only of altering its structure but also of generating new neurons, even into old age. The brain can adapt, heal, renew itself after trauma, and compensate for disability.

Begley documents how this fundamental paradigm shift is transforming both our understanding of the human mind and our approach to deep-seated emotional, cognitive, and behavioral problems. These breakthroughs show that it is possible to reset our happiness meter, regain the use of limbs disabled by stroke, train the mind to break cycles of depression and OCD, and reverse age-related changes in the brain. They also suggest that it is possible to teach and learn compassion, a key step in the Dalai Lama’s quest for a more peaceful world. But as we learn from studies performed on Buddhist monks, an important component in changing the brain is to tap the power of mind and, in particular, focused attention. This is the classic Buddhist practice of mindfulness, a technique that has become popular in the West and that is immediately available to everyone.

With her extraordinary gift for making science accessible, meaningful, and compelling, Sharon Begley illuminates a profound shift in our understanding of how the brain and the mind interact. This tremendously hopeful book takes us to the leading edge of a revolution in what it means to be human.


From the Hardcover edition.
Richard J. Davidson
Del mismo modo que cada uno de nosotros tiene una huella dactilar única, también cada
persona posee una forma personal y exclusiva de sentir y reaccionar a cuanto le ocurre, un
perfil emocional individualizado que forma parte de lo que somos y nos diferencia de los demás. Un perfil constituido por el modo en que nos enfrentamos a la adversidad, la actitud frente a la que encaramos la vida, la intuición social, la autoconciencia, la sensibilidad al contexto y la atención hacia lo que realizamos. Un perfi l que nos hace quienes somos.

Cuando sufres un revés, ¿eres capaz de superarlo con naturalidad? Si las cosas no salen como quieres, ¿mantienes pese a ello la energía y el optimismo? ¿Sabes interpretar el lenguaje no
verbal de las personas que te rodean? ¿Eres consciente de por qué actúas de la manera en que lo haces en cada momento? ¿Te comportas en general como se espera que lo hagas? ¿Te concentras con facilidad o te resulta difícil mantener la atención? En la respuesta a esas preguntas están los ingredientes del perfi l emocional de nuestro cerebro.

Richard J. Davidson pone de manifiesto en este libro, único en su género, la química cerebral
que hay tras cada una de las dimensiones que constituyen el estilo emocional y analiza la forma en que cada una de ellas influye en la salud del ser humano. Propone, además,
ejercicios basados en la meditación que pueden ayudarnos a transformar aquellos patrones del cerebro que perjudican nuestro desarrollo como personas, lo que convierte este libro en una auténtica guía para fortalecer la empatía, el optimismo y la sensación de bienestar.
Sharon Begley
Jeffrey M. Schwartz
A groundbreaking work of science that confirms, for the first time, the independent existence of the mind–and demonstrates the possibilities for human control over the workings of the brain.

Conventional science has long held the position that 'the mind' is merely an illusion, a side effect of electrochemical activity in the physical brain. Now in paperback, Dr Jeffrey Schwartz and Sharon Begley's groundbreaking work, The Mind and the Brain, argues exactly the opposite: that the mind has a life of its own.Dr Schwartz, a leading researcher in brain dysfunctions, and Wall Street Journal science columnist Sharon Begley demonstrate that the human mind is an independent entity that can shape and control the functioning of the physical brain. Their work has its basis in our emerging understanding of adult neuroplasticity–the brain's ability to be rewired not just in childhood, but throughout life, a trait only recently established by neuroscientists.

Through decades of work treating patients with obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD), Schwartz made an extraordinary finding: while following the therapy he developed, his patients were effecting significant and lasting changes in their own neural pathways. It was a scientific first: by actively focusing their attention away from negative behaviors and toward more positive ones, Schwartz's patients were using their minds to reshape their brains–and discovering a thrilling new dimension to the concept of neuroplasticity.

The Mind and the Brain follows Schwartz as he investigates this newly discovered power, which he calls self–directed neuroplasticity or, more simply, mental force. It describes his work with noted physicist Henry Stapp and connects the concept of 'mental force' with the ancient practice of mindfulness in Buddhist tradition. And it points to potential new applications that could transform the treatment of almost every variety of neurological dysfunction, from dyslexia to stroke–and could lead to new strategies to help us harness our mental powers. Yet as wondrous as these implications are, perhaps even more important is the philosophical dimension of Schwartz's work. For the existence of mental force offers convincing scientific evidence of human free will, and thus of man's inherent capacity for moral choice.

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