A Spy in the Archives: A Memoir of Cold War Russia

I.B.Tauris
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Moscow in the 1960s was the other side of the Iron Curtain: mysterious, exotic, even dangerous. In 1966 the historian Sheila Fitzpatrick travelled to Moscow to research in the Soviet archives. This was the era of Brezhnev, of a possible ‘thaw’ in the Cold War, when the Soviets couldn’t decide either to thaw out properly or re-freeze. Moscow, the world capital of socialism, was renowned for its drabness. The buses were overcrowded; there were endemic shortages and endless queues. This was also the age of regular spying scandals and tit-for-tat diplomatic expulsions and it was no surprise that visiting students were subject to intense scrutiny by the KGB. Many of Fitzpatrick’s friends were involved in espionage activities – and indeed others were accused of being spies or kept under close surveillance. In this book, Sheila Fitzpatrick provides a unique insight into everyday life in Soviet Moscow. Full of drama and colourful characters, her remarkable memoir highlights the dangers and drudgery faced by Westerners living under communism.
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About the author

Sheila Fitzpatrick is Honorary Professor of History at the University of Sydney and Emerita Professor of History at the University of Chicago, USA. One of the most acclaimed historians of twentieth-century Russia, she is the author of several books, including "The Russian Revolution";" Stalin's Peasants"; "Everyday Stalinism"; and "Tear off the Masks!
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Additional Information

Publisher
I.B.Tauris
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Published on
Nov 6, 2013
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Pages
352
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ISBN
9780857734815
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Personal Memoirs
History / Modern / 20th Century
History / Russia & the Former Soviet Union
Political Science / Political Ideologies / Communism, Post-Communism & Socialism
Political Science / World / Russian & Former Soviet Union
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From the author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning history The Dead Hand comes the riveting story of a spy who cracked open the Soviet military research establishment and a penetrating portrait of the CIA’s Moscow station, an outpost of daring espionage in the last years of the Cold War
 
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   One of the most valuable spies to work for the United States in the four decades of global confrontation with the Soviet Union, Tolkachev took enormous personal risks—but so did the Americans. The CIA had long struggled to recruit and run agents in Moscow, and Tolkachev was a singular breakthrough. Using spy cameras and secret codes as well as face-to-face meetings in parks and on street corners, Tolkachev and his handlers succeeded for years in eluding the feared KGB in its own backyard, until the day came when a shocking betrayal put them all at risk. 
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