Building Movement Bridges

Contributions in Sociology

Book 138
Greenwood Publishing Group
Free sample

Activists often participate in more than one social movement and organization. Bridging organizations are formed by activists who feel that the movements in which they are participating do not adequately address the various issues they are involved in. The author provides a case study of the Coalition of Labor Union Women (CLUW), an organization which was founded in 1974.

Using the CLUW as a model, the author demonstrates how one organization can address the needs of diverse social movements, in this case the women's movement and the labor movement. By tracing the formation and development of the CLUW, the author illustrates and elaborates on her theories concerning social movements and bridging organizations. She uses historical documents, first hand accounts, and a case study approach to analyze the interrelatedness of oppression, opposition, social change, movement change, and personal change associated with social movements and bridging organizations. Detailing the obstacles the CLUW faces, the author makes clear how important such organizations are as well as how difficult it can be to negotiate the collective identity of its members and reconcile the needs of various social groups represented therein.

Read more
Collapse

About the author

SILKE ROTH is Visiting Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Pennsylvania.

Read more
Collapse
Loading...

Additional Information

Publisher
Greenwood Publishing Group
Read more
Collapse
Published on
Dec 31, 2003
Read more
Collapse
Pages
207
Read more
Collapse
ISBN
9780313316326
Read more
Collapse
Read more
Collapse
Read more
Collapse
Language
English
Read more
Collapse
Genres
Political Science / Labor & Industrial Relations
Social Science / Sociology / General
Read more
Collapse
Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
Read more
Collapse
Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
Read more
Collapse
Eligible for Family Library

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.
The first book of its kind, this discography covers the history of steel band and pan music on recordings from their beginnings. In more than 775 entries, it comprises all known recordings on phonograph records, cassettes, and compact disks in which one or more steel pans is featured or used in an accompanying role. This includes steel bands of any size and configuration, pan soloists, and small ensembles in a variety of settings. For each entry, information is provided on the location of the recording session/studio, release date, record company catalog number, and complete contents. Indexes facilitate access to artists, arrangers/conductors/musical directors, record titles, years of release, and compositions; and appendices provide additional information on record manufacturers and distributors, calypsonians, and sources. A reference bibliography completes the work.

The creation, teaching, and performance of most of othe pan music of the past belongs to an oral tradition. There is therefore little written preservation of this work and audio recordings often provide the only documentation of the art of many gifted composers, arrangers, performers, and tuners. These recordings constitute a primary source of information regarding past performance practices, evolving playing styles and techniques, and pan tuning innovations. While serving as a guide for locating these recordings, this discography also will function as a research tool to aid researchers into many other aspects of the steel pan movement. As such, it will be a valuable resource for scholars, performing artists, educators, instrument builders, composers, arrangers, and enthusiasts.

From its beginning as an independent state, Israel has been beset by the divisions and tensions that characterize most ethnically mixed societies. Kraus and Hodge investigate the process of stratification in Israel and document what happened to Arabs as well as to Jewish immigrants and their children in the Promised Land by tracing not just the socioeconomic locations, but also the proximate social determinants of the locations of significant ethnic, cultural, gender, and religious groups. The first extensively detailed analysis to account for status attainment in Israel, this work contributes to a general understanding of the status-attainment process in ethnically heterogeneous societies by focusing on the experience of immigrants as they carved out careers in their homeland. By generalizing the results for Israel, the authors contend, the study illustrates processes that occurred during periods of sustained immigration in the United States and other ethnically and religiously heterogeneous populations for which relevant data can no longer be collected. Many of the research findings about Israeli society have significant implications for social policy in Israel and elsewhere.

The investigation begins with a brief review of relevant recurring themes in the sociological literature with particular reference to the functional theory of stratification to provide a theoretical background for the study--the authors' novel analyses have not been reported elsewhere. Chapter 2 provides the social context by presenting a picture of Israeli society and its development. The extension of the scope of functional theory is worked out in chapter 3 which develops a basic model of the status-attainment process in Israeli society. Chapters 4 through 6 propose two alternative hypotheses for ethnic stratification in Israel and test them by examining the attainment process in the two main Jewish ethnic groups. Chapter 7 discusses the two hypotheses by distinguishing between Arabs and Jewish ethnic groups. In chapter 8 the attainment processes of ethnic and gender groups are examined. Kraus and Hodge conclude with an overview of findings and places the Israeli case in comparative perspective. Promises in the Promised Land will be of interest to students of Israeli society and to scholars concerned with issues of racial and ethnic stratification, immigration, and status-attainment processes. Informal Israel watchers of all backgrounds and persuasions as well as policy-makers, especially those working in multiethnic societies where national policy can impact profoundly on sociocultural integration, will find the insights offered here of particular value.

The study of continuities and discon-tinuties in American working-class life represents a central concern in the literature on stratification and equality. This book, based on a 1975 Ford Foundation conference and updated to take into account the most recent developments, offers a sobering appraisal of the American working class, revealing the continuing gap between organized and unorganized workers despite the huge increase in the work force; the emergence of subclass structures between factory workers at one end and workers engaged in marginal occupations at the other; and the durability of pluralistic, multiclass politics within this large and amorphous working class.

The volume is unique for several reasons: it focuses directly on the role of women in the labor force, ethnic and racial divisions within the working class, and the place of organized labor in international affairs. The American Working CJass Today offers a penetrating and wide-ranging examination by leading social and political researchers of a range of problems -- from how data are collected and manipulated to what the future holds for American workers.

Contents and Contributors: THE THEORY OF AN AMERICAN WORKING CLASS John H.M. Laslett, S.M. Miller, Martha Bush, Irving Louis Horowitz CLEAVAGES AND CHANGES WITHIN THE WORKING CLASS Edna Bonacich, Gabriel Kolko, Edna E. Raphael. Robert Bibb, Martin Oppenheimer, Frank Riessman, John C. Leggett THE WORKING CLASS IN AN INTERNATIONAL CONTEXT Henry Berger. William H. Form, Helen Icken Safa, Elizabeth Jelin

From 2020 Democratic presidential candidate Andrew Yang, a captivating account of how "a skinny Asian kid from upstate" became a successful entrepreneur, only to find a new mission: calling attention to the urgent steps America must take, including Universal Basic Income, to stabilize our economy amid rapid technological change and automation.

The shift toward automation is about to create a tsunami of unemployment. Not in the distant future--now. One recent estimate predicts 45 million American workers will lose their jobs within the next twelve years--jobs that won't be replaced. In a future marked by restlessness and chronic unemployment, what will happen to American society?

In The War on Normal People, Andrew Yang paints a dire portrait of the American economy. Rapidly advancing technologies like artificial intelligence, robotics and automation software are making millions of Americans' livelihoods irrelevant. The consequences of these trends are already being felt across our communities in the form of political unrest, drug use, and other social ills. The future looks dire-but is it unavoidable?

In The War on Normal People, Yang imagines a different future--one in which having a job is distinct from the capacity to prosper and seek fulfillment. At this vision's core is Universal Basic Income, the concept of providing all citizens with a guaranteed income-and one that is rapidly gaining popularity among forward-thinking politicians and economists. Yang proposes that UBI is an essential step toward a new, more durable kind of economy, one he calls "human capitalism."
American feminism has always been about more than the struggle for individual rights and equal treatment with men. There's also a vital and continuing tradition of women's reform that sought social as well as individual rights and argued for the dismantling of the masculine standard. In this much anticipated book, Dorothy Sue Cobble retrieves the forgotten feminism of the previous generations of working women, illuminating the ideas that inspired them and the reforms they secured from employers and the state. This socially and ethnically diverse movement for change emerged first from union halls and factory floors and spread to the "pink collar" domain of telephone operators, secretaries, and airline hostesses. From the 1930s to the 1980s, these women pursued answers to problems that are increasingly pressing today: how to balance work and family and how to address the growing economic inequalities that confront us. The Other Women's Movement traces their impact from the 1940s into the feminist movement of the present.

The labor reformers whose stories are told in The Other Women's Movement wanted equality and "special benefits," and they did not see the two as incompatible. They argued that gender differences must be accommodated and that "equality" could not always be achieved by applying an identical standard of treatment to men and women. The reform agenda they championed--an end to unfair sex discrimination, just compensation for their waged labor, and the right to care for their families and communities--launched a revolution in employment practices that carries on today.


Unique in its range and perspective, this is the first book to link the continuous tradition of social feminism to the leadership of labor women within that movement.

©2019 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google|Location: United StatesLanguage: English (United States)
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.