A Smattering of Latin: Get classical with trivia, quizzes and fun

Pavilion Books
Free sample

This fun, absorbing book, packed with quirky bite-sized lists, quizzes and trivia, is an exploration of the Latin language, aiming to prove that it is as vibrant and relevant today as it was 2,500 years ago. It includes sections on Latin in the movies, US state mottoes and place names, and also some choice snippets from real Latin poetry from Catullus, Horace and Virgil, with evocative translations. It contains a fascinating section on the Roman emperors and what they got up to, and gives the basics of the language itself for anyone who would like to learn it. Quizzes allow the reader to guess the names of famous books, songs and James Bond films, cunningly translated into Latin. From the spells in Harry Potter to the use of Latin in Asterix, to the Latin terms that litter law and medicine to the meaning behind UK football club mottoes, this book is the perfect gift for anyone who wants to brush up their Latin, whether they studied it at school or not.
Read more
Collapse

About the author

Simon James teaches Latin at Westminster school in London, where he has lived and worked for many years. An avid cinephile, he is also the author of The London Film Location Guide.

Read more
Collapse
Loading...

Additional Information

Publisher
Pavilion Books
Read more
Collapse
Published on
Oct 1, 2016
Read more
Collapse
Pages
300
Read more
Collapse
ISBN
9781911042648
Read more
Collapse
Read more
Collapse
Read more
Collapse
Language
English
Read more
Collapse
Genres
Humor / General
Read more
Collapse
Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
Read more
Collapse
Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
Read more
Collapse
Eligible for Family Library

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.
If you’ve had the distinct privilege of spending any amount of time with me, you know by now that I’m an opinionated guy. What’s more, you’ve realized that I often present my opinions as fact. What better way to cement these opinions as such than to remove them from the malleable medium of a blog and print them indelibly in this digital volume? If you read it in an ebook, you know it’s true. It is my intent that this book reads as a collection of short stories. Creative (non)fiction, as the Library Of Congress might call it. As a result, you’ll find references to events in the past interspersed with rants and tangents (rantgents) about things that I currently hate, or at least somewhat convincingly pretend to hate. You might even find a few chapters about things I don’t hate. I have adapted a couple of the chapters in this book from my blog, Rhetorock, which you can and will follow at jondavidsonmusic.blogspot.com. However, I’ve removed any sense of chronological order. My mind rarely sits still. Metaphorically. Physically, it’s typically firmly lodged inside my skull. Right now, I’m simultaneously thinking about bath salts, kidney beans, Levi’s 510s, Jeremiah, Obamacare, Keane, and why I put my underwear on inside out again. Rather than attempt to tame the meandering beast that is my stream of consciousness, I’ve written in a way that reflects my usual thought processes. You’re welcome. Opinions represented in this book are solely mine, although I suppose that probably goes without saying. Some opinions have changed since I’ve written certain chapters. I’ve completely fabricated some opinions for the sake of discussion and entertainment, and to try to make others look stupid. However, some of the opinions I’ve expressed are completely serious. Feel free to disagree with me on anything and everything. Use your judgment, and take everything I’ve penned with a grain of salt. Better yet, with a massive salt lick. Make sure it’s iodized salt, though. Goiters are really not all that cool. If you’re offended by anything that I’ve written, I sincerely apologize. You have taken me way too seriously. Write me an angry letter, and then take that letter and light it on fire. It is my hope that this book makes you laugh, cry, and ponder. Simultaneously, you big thoughtful blubbering mess. Life is short, and we’re not given a lot of time on this earth. I hope you enjoy the time you spend with this book.
Dura-Europos, a Parthian-ruled Greco-Syrian city, was captured by Rome c.AD165. It then accommodated a Roman garrison until its destruction by Sasanian siege c.AD256. Excavations of the site between the World Wars made sensational discoveries, and with renewed exploration from 1986 to 2011, Dura remains the best-explored city of the Roman East. A critical revelation was a sprawling Roman military base occupying a quarter of the city's interior. This included swathes of civilian housing converted to soldiers' accommodation and several existing sanctuaries, as well as baths, an amphitheatre, headquarters, and more temples added by the garrison. Base and garrison were clearly fundamental factors in the history of Roman Dura, but what impact did they have on the civil population? Original excavators gloomily portrayed Durenes evicted from their homes and holy places, and subjected to extortion and impoverishment by brutal soldiers, while recent commentators have envisaged military-civilian concordia, with shared prosperity and integration. Detailed examination of the evidence presents a new picture. Through the use of GPS, satellite, geophysical and archival evidence, this volume shows that the Roman military base and resident community were even bigger than previously understood, with both military and civil communities appearing much more internally complex than has been allowed until now. The result is a fascinating social dynamic which we can partly reconstruct, giving us a nuanced picture of life in a city near the eastern frontier of the Roman world.
©2019 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google|Location: United StatesLanguage: English (United States)
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.