The Lady of the Lake

A. and C. Black

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Publisher
A. and C. Black
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Published on
Dec 31, 1853
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Pages
375
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Language
English
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This content is DRM protected.
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Sir Walter Scott
Book 22
Sir Walter Scott, the Scottish novelist, poet, historian and biographer, is often regarded as the inventor of the historical novel, who produced a wide body of literary works, having a profound impact on world literature. This comprehensive eBook presents Scott’s complete fictional works, with numerous illustrations, rare texts appearing in digital print for the first time, informative introductions and the usual Delphi bonus material. (Version 7)

* Beautifully illustrated with images relating to Scott’s life and works
* Concise introductions to the novels and other texts
* ALL 26 novels, with individual contents tables
* Rare novels and shorter fiction often missed out of collections
* Images of how the books were first published, giving your eReader a taste of the original texts
* Excellent formatting of the texts
* Famous works such as WAVERLEY, ROB ROY and IVANHOE are fully illustrated with their original artwork
* Special chronological and alphabetical contents tables for the poetry
* Easily locate the poems you want to read
* Includes Scott’s rare poetry collections and plays – available in no other collection
* Includes a wide selection of Scott’s non-fiction – spend hours exploring the author’s varied works
* Special criticism section with essays by writers such as Henry James, Leslie Stephen and Charles Dickens examining Scott's literary achievements
* Features two biographies – discover Scott’s literary life
* Scholarly ordering of texts into chronological order and literary genres
* UPDATED with entirely revised texts, new formatting, rare plays and new introductions

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CONTENTS:

The Novels
WAVERLEY
GUY MANNERING
THE ANTIQUARY
BLACK DWARF
OLD MORTALITY
ROB ROY
THE HEART OF MIDLOTHIAN
THE BRIDE OF LAMMERMOOR
A LEGEND OF MONTROSE
IVANHOE
THE MONASTERY
THE ABBOT
KENILWORTH
THE PIRATE
THE FORTUNES OF NIGEL
PEVERIL OF THE PEAK
QUENTIN DURWARD
ST. RONAN’S WELL
REDGAUNTLET
THE BETROTHED
THE TALISMAN
WOODSTOCK
THE FAIR MAID OF PERTH
ANNE OF GEIERSTEIN
COUNT ROBERT OF PARIS
CASTLE DANGEROUS

The Shorter Fiction
CHRONICLES OF THE CANONGATE
MY AUNT MARGARET’S MIRROR
THE TAPESTRIED CHAMBER
DEATH OF THE LAIRD’S JOCK.
MISCELLANEOUS SHORT PIECES

The Plays
GOETZ VON BERLICHINGEN
HALIDON HILL
MACDUFF’S CROSS
THE DOOM OF DEVORGOIL
AUCHINDRANE
THE HOUSE OF ASPEN

The Poetry Collections
TRANSLATIONS AND IMITATIONS FROM GERMAN BALLADS
THE MINSTRELSY OF THE SCOTTISH BORDER
THE LAY OF THE LAST MINSTREL
BALLADS AND LYRICAL PIECES
MARMION
THE LADY OF THE LAKE
THE VISION OF DON RODERICK
THE BRIDAL OF TRIERMAIN
ROKEBY
THE FIELD OF WATERLOO
THE LORD OF THE ISLES
HAROLD THE DAUNTLESS
MISCELLANEOUS POEMS

The Poems
LIST OF POEMS IN CHRONOLOGICAL ORDER
LIST OF POEMS IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER

The Non-Fiction
THE LIFE OF JOHN DRYDEN
PAUL’S LETTERS TO HIS KINSFOLK
THE JOURNAL OF SIR WALTER SCOTT
THE LETTERS OF MALACHI MALAGROWTHER
THE LIFE OF NAPOLEON BUONAPARTE
TALES OF A GRANDFATHER
LETTERS ON DEMONOLOGY AND WITCHCRAFT
TRIAL OF DUNCAN TERIG, ALIAS CLERK, AND ALEXANDER BANE MACDONALD
MISCELLANEOUS PROSE WORKS

The Criticism
SIR WALTER SCOTT by William Hazlitt
SIR WALTER SCOTT by Leslie Stephen
THE POEMS OF SIR WALTER SCOTT by Andrew Lang
LETTERS TO DEAD AUTHORS by Andrew Lang
SIR WALTER SCOTT AND THE BORDER MINSTRELSY by Andrew Lang
SIR WALTER SCOTT AS A CRITIC OF LITERATURE by Margaret Ball
SIR WALTER SCOTT: A LECTURE by William Ker
SIR WALTER SCOTT by Henry James
MEMORIES AND PORTRAITS by Robert Louis Stevenson
SCOTT AND HIS PUBLISHERS by Charles Dickens
SIR WALTER SCOTT AND LADY MORGAN by Victor Hugo

The Biographies
SIR WALTER SCOTT by Richard H. Hutton
SIR WALTER SCOTT by George Saintsbury

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SIR WALTER SCOTT, Bart.
WAVERLEY

OR 'TIS SIXTY YEARS HENCE

By SIR WALTER SCOTT, Bart.

Under which King, Bezonian? speak, or die!

_Henry IV. Part II._

TO

MARY MONICA HOPE SCOTT

OF ABBOTSFORD

THIS EDITION OF

THE NOVELS OF HER GREAT-GRANDFATHER

WALTER SCOTT

IS

DEDICATED

BY THE PUBLISHERS.

ADVERTISEMENT.

In printing this New Edition of the Waverley Novels, the

Publishers have availed themselves of the opportunity thus

afforded them of carefully collating it with the valuable interleaved

copy in their possession, containing the Author's latest

manuscript corrections and notes; and from this source they

have obtained several annotations of considerable interest, never

before published. As examples of some of the more important

of these may be mentioned the notes on ``High Jinks'' in Guy

Mannering, ``Pr<ae>torium'' in the Antiquary, and the ``Expulsion

of the Scotch Bishops'' in the Heart of Midlothian.

There have also been inserted (within brackets) some minor

notes explanatory of references now rendered perhaps somewhat

obscure by the lapse of time. For these, the Publishers have

been chiefly indebted to Mr. David Laing, Secretary of the

Bannatyne Club, and one of the few surviving friends of the

Author.

Fortunately there is now little more required in the way of

annotation to the Waverley Novels; but in order to afford every

facility of reference, a special glossary has been added to such

of the novels as require it, and each volume will contain a

separate index. A General Index will also be appended to the

concluding volume of the series.

EDINBURGH, _December_ 1869,

ADVERTISEMENT TO EDITION 1829

It has been the occasional occupation of the Author of Waverley for

several years past to revise and correct the voluminous series of

Novels which pass under that name, in order that, if they should

ever appear as his avowed productions, he might render them in

some degree deserving of a continuance of the public favour with

which they have been honoured ever since their first appearance. For

a long period, however, it seemed likely that the improved and illustrated

edition which he meditated would be a posthumous publication.

But the course of the events which occasioned the disclosure of the

Author's name having in a great measure restored to him a sort of

parental control over these Works, he is naturally induced to give

them to the press in a corrected, and, he hopes, an improved form,

while life and health permit the task of revising and illustrating

them. Such being his purpose, it is necessary to say a few words

on the plan of the proposed Edition.

In stating it to be revised and corrected, it is not to be inferred

that any attempt is made to alter the tenor of the stories, the character

of the actors, or the spirit of the dialogue. There is no doubt

ample room for emendation in all these points---but where the tree

falls it must lie. Any attempt to obviate criticism, however just,

by altering a work already in the hands of the public, is generally

unsuccessful. In the most improbable fiction the reader still desires

some air of vraisemblance, and does not relish that the incidents of

a tale familiar to him should be altered to suit the taste of critics,

or the caprice of the author himself. This process of feeling is so

natural that it may be observed even in children, who cannot endure

that a nursery story should be repeated to them differently from the

manner in which it was first told.

But without altering in the slightest degree either the story or the

mode of telling it, the Author has taken this opportunity to correct

errors of the press and slips of the pen. That such should exist

cannot be wondered at, when it is considered that the Publishers

found it their interest to hurry through the press a succession of the

early editions of the various Novels, and that the Author had not

the usual opportunity of revision. It is hoped that the present

edition will be found free from errors of that accidental kind.

The Author has also ventured to make some emendations of a

different character, which, without being such apparent deviations

from the original stories as to disturb the reader's old associations,

will, he thinks, add something to the spirit of the dialogue, narrative,

or description. These consist in occasional pruning where the language

is redundant, compression where the style is loose, infusion of

vigour where it is languid, the exchange of less forcible for more

appropriate epithets---slight alterations, in short, like the last touches

of an artist, which contribute to heighten and finish the picture,

though an inexperienced eye can hardly detect in what they consist.

SIR WALTER SCOTT, BART.


THE HEART OF MID-LOTHIAN

BY SIR WALTER SCOTT, BART.

TALES OF MY LANDLORD

COLLECTED AND ARRANGED

BY JEDEDIAH CLEISHBOTHAM,

SCHOOLMASTER AND PARISH CLERK OF GANDERCLEUGH.

Hear, Land o' Cakes and brither Scots,

Frae Maidenkirk to Johnny Groat's,

If there's a hole in a' your coats,

I rede ye tent it;

A chiel's amang you takin' notes,

An' faith he'll prent it!---=Burns.=

Ahora bien, dijo el Cura: traedme, senor hu<e'>sped, aquesos libros, que

los quiero ver. Que me place, respondi<o'> el; y entrando en su aposento, saco

d<e'>l una maletilla vieja cerrada con una cadenilla, y abri<e'>ndola, hall<o'>

en

ella tres libros grandes y unos papeles de muy buena letra escritos de

mano.---=Don Quixote.= Parte I. Capitulo 32.

TO THE BEST OF PATRONS,

A PLEASED AND INDULGENT READER

JEDEDIAH CLEISHBOTHAM

WISHES HEALTH, AND INCREASE, AND CONTENTMENT.

Courteous Reader,

If ingratitude comprehendeth every vice, surely so foul a stain worst

of all beseemeth him whose life has been devoted to instructing youth

in virtue and in humane letters. Therefore have I chosen, in this

prolegomenon, to unload my burden of thanks at thy feet, for the

favour with which thou last kindly entertained the Tales of my

Landlord. Certes, if thou hast chuckled over their factious and

festivous descriptions, or hadst thy mind filled with pleasure at the

strange and pleasant turns of fortune which they record, verily, I

have also simpered when I beheld a second storey with attics, that has

arisen on the basis of my small domicile at Gandercleugh, the walls

having been aforehand pronounced by Deacon Barrow to be capable of

enduring such an elevation. Nor has it been without delectation

that I have endued a new coat (snuff-brown, and with metal buttons),

having all nether garments corresponding thereto. We do therefore

lie, in respect of each other, under a reciprocation of benefits, whereof

those received by me being the most solid (in respect that a new house

and a new coat are better than a new tale and an old song), it is

meet that my gratitude should be expressed with the louder voice and

more preponderating vehemence. And how should it be so expressed?

---Certainly not in words only, but in act and deed. It is with this

sole purpose, and disclaiming all intention of purchasing that pendicle

or poffle of land called the Carlinescroft, lying adjacent to my garden,

and measuring seven acres, three roods, and four perches, that I have

committed to the eyes of those who thought well of the former tomes,

these four additional volumes<*> of the Tales of my Landlord. Not

* [The Heart of Mid-Lothian was originally published in 4 vols.]

the less, if Peter Prayfort be minded to sell the said poffle, it is at

his own choice to say so; and, peradventure, he may meet with a

purchaser: unless (gentle reader) the pleasing pourtraictures of Peter

Pattieson, now given unto thee in particular, and unto the public in

general, shall have lost their favour in thine eyes, whereof I am no

way distrustful. And so much confidence do I repose in thy continued

favour, that, should thy lawful occasions call thee to the town

of Gandercleugh, a place frequented by most at one time or other in

their lives, I will enrich thine eyes with a sight of those precious

manuscripts whence thou hast derived so much delectation, thy nose

with a snuff from my mull, and thy palate with a dram from my

bottle of strong waters, called by the learned of Gandercleugh, the

Dominie's Dribble o' Drink.

It is there, O highly esteemed and beloved reader, thou wilt be able

to bear testimony, through the medium of thine own senses, against

the children of vanity, who have sought to identify thy friend and

servant with I know not what inditer of vain fables; who hath

cumbered the world with his devices, but shrunken from the responsibility

thereof. Truly, this hath been well termed a generation hard

of faith; since what can a man do to assert his property in a printed

tome, saving to put his name in the title-page thereof, with his description,

or designation, as the lawyers term it, and place of abode?

Of a surety I would have such sceptics consider how they themselves

would brook to have their works ascribed to others, their names and

professions imputed as forgeries, and their very existence brought into

question; even although, peradventure, it may be it is of little consequence

to any but themselves, not only whether they are living or dead,

but even whether they ever lived or no. Yet have my maligners carried

their uncharitable censures still farther.
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