War is a Racket!: And Other Essential Reading

The Forlorn Press
13
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 A true classic! This is one of the best pieces of anti-war literature ever written. Marine Corps Major General Smedley Butler holds no punches in this indictment against the war profiteering racket and the unnecessary loss of life that is the end result of abhorrent industry.
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4.6
13 total
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Additional Information

Publisher
The Forlorn Press
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Published on
Jul 2, 2015
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Pages
658
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Military / Biological & Chemical Warfare
History / Military / General
History / Military / Other
History / Military / United States
History / Military / World War I
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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“The bard of biological weapons captures the drama of the front lines.”—Richard Danzig, former secretary of the navy

The first major bioterror event in the United States-the anthrax attacks in October 2001-was a clarion call for scientists who work with “hot” agents to find ways of protecting civilian populations against biological weapons. In The Demon in the Freezer, his first nonfiction book since The Hot Zone, a #1 New York Times bestseller, Richard Preston takes us into the heart of Usamriid, the United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases at Fort Detrick, Maryland, once the headquarters of the U.S. biological weapons program and now the epicenter of national biodefense.

Peter Jahrling, the top scientist at Usamriid, a wry virologist who cut his teeth on Ebola, one of the world’s most lethal emerging viruses, has ORCON security clearance that gives him access to top secret information on bioweapons. His most urgent priority is to develop a drug that will take on smallpox-and win. Eradicated from the planet in 1979 in one of the great triumphs of modern science, the smallpox virus now resides, officially, in only two high-security freezers-at the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta and in Siberia, at a Russian virology institute called Vector. But the demon in the freezer has been set loose. It is almost certain that illegal stocks are in the possession of hostile states, including Iraq and North Korea. Jahrling is haunted by the thought that biologists in secret labs are using genetic engineering to create a new superpox virus, a smallpox resistant to all vaccines.

Usamriid went into a state of Delta Alert on September 11 and activated its emergency response teams when the first anthrax letters were opened in New York and Washington, D.C. Preston reports, in unprecedented detail, on the government’ s response to the attacks and takes us into the ongoing FBI investigation. His story is based on interviews with top-level FBI agents and with Dr. Steven Hatfill.

Jahrling is leading a team of scientists doing controversial experiments with live smallpox virus at CDC. Preston takes us into the lab where Jahrling is reawakening smallpox and explains, with cool and devastating precision, what may be at stake if his last bold experiment fails.
 -With Forty-Five Illustrations by F. Strothmann and Fifty-Five Illustrations by Lester Ralph. 

-Table of contents to every chapters in the book. 

-Complete and formatted to improve your reading experience 


In the form of a diary, Adam (based on Twain himself) describes how Eve (modeled after his wife Livy) gets introduced into the Garden of Eden, and how he has to deal with "this new creature with the long hair". The piece gives a humorous account of Genesis. It begins with the introduction of Eve, described as an annoying creature with a penchant for naming things, which Adam could do without. It moves on to detail Eve eating the apple and finding Cain, a perplexing creature which Adam can not figure out. He devotes his ironically scientific mind to demystifying Cain's species, thinking it a fish, then a kangaroo, then a bear. Eventually he figures out it is a human, like himself.
The work is humorous and ironic, and gives a new spin on Genesis: few people have considered what life must have been like for Adam, who is discovering everything anew; the work does not consider God's role at all; and eventually, despite his initial deep annoyance with Eve, Adam finds himself in love with her.

Eve's Diary is a comic short story by Mark Twain. It was first published in the 1905 Christmas issue of the magazine Harper's Bazaar, and in book format in June 1906 by Harper and Brothers publishing house. It is written in the style of a diary kept by the first woman in the biblical creation story, Eve, and is claimed to be "translated from the original MS." The "plot" of this novel is the first-person account of Eve from her creation up to her burial by, her mate, Adam, including meeting and getting to know Adam, and exploring the world around her, Eden. The story then jumps 40 years into the future after the Fall and expulsion from Eden. It is one of a series of books Twain wrote concerning the story of Adam and Eve, including 'Extracts from Adam's Diary,' 'That Day In Eden,' 'Eve Speaks,' 'Adam's Soliloquy,' and the 'Autobiography of Eve.' Eve's Diary has a lighter tone than the others in the series, as Eve has a strong appreciation for beauty and love. The book may have been written as a posthumous love-letter to Mark Twain's wife Olivia Langdon Clemens, or Livy, who died in June 1904, just before the story was written. Mark Twain is quoted as saying, "Eve's Diary is finished — I've been waiting for her to speak, but she doesn't say anything more." The story ends with Adam's speaking at Eve's grave, "Wherever she was, there was Eden."
Is there any knowledge in the world which is so certain that no reasonable man could doubt it? This question, which at first sight might not seem difficult, is really one of the most difficult that can be asked. When we have realized the obstacles in the way of a straightforward and confident answer, we shall be well launched on the study of philosophy—for philosophy is merely the attempt to answer such ultimate questions, not carelessly and dogmatically, as we do in ordinary life and even in the sciences, but critically, after exploring all that makes such questions puzzling, and after realizing all the vagueness and confusion that underlie our ordinary ideas.

In daily life, we assume as certain many things which, on a closer scrutiny, are found to be so full of apparent contradictions that only a great amount of thought enables us to know what it is that we really may believe. In the search for certainty, it is natural to begin with our present experiences, and in some sense, no doubt, knowledge is to be derived from them. But any statement as to what it is that our immediate experiences make us know is very likely to be wrong. It seems to me that I am now sitting in a chair, at a table of a certain shape, on which I see sheets of paper with writing or print. By turning my head I see out of the window buildings and clouds and the sun. I believe that the sun is about ninety-three million miles from the earth; that it is a hot globe many times bigger than the earth; that, owing to the earth's rotation, it rises every morning, and will continue to do so for an indefinite time in the future. I believe that, if any other normal person comes into my room, he will see the same chairs and tables and books and papers as I see, and that the table which I see is the same as the table which I feel pressing against my arm. All this seems to be so evident as to be hardly worth stating, except in answer to a man who doubts whether I know anything. Yet all this may be reasonably doubted, and all of it requires much careful discussion before we can be sure that we have stated it in a form that is wholly true....

 

This is the COMPLETE WORKS of America's favourite storyteller Mark Twain. The eBook contains every novel, short story - even the very rare ones ñ essay, travel book, non-fiction text, letter and much, much more! . (Current Version: 3)

Features:
* ALL 12 novels, with concise introductions and contents tables
* images of how the books first appeared, giving your eReader a taste of the original texts
* includes Twain's rare unfinished novel 'The Mysterious Stranger', often missed out of collections
* ALL of the short stories, with quality formatting
* the short stories have their own chronological and alphabetical contents tables - find that special story easily!
* Twain's 20 short story contributions to "The Library of Humor", with their own contents table
* even INCLUDES Twain's complete letters, essays and satires - with their own special contents tables
* ALL of the travel writing, with contents tables
* includes Twain's "Chapters from My Autobiography"
* SPECIAL BONUS texts, including three contemporary Twain biographies - explore the great man's amazing life in Paine's and Howells' famous biographies!
* UPDATED with a special literary criticism section, with various works exploring Twain's contribution to literature
* UPDATED with Archibald Henderson's critical study MARK TWAIN
* UPDATED with the complete speeches
* scholarly ordering of texts into chronological order and literary genres

The eBook also includes a front no-nonsense table of contents to allow easy navigation around Twain's immense oeuvre. Welcome to hours upon hours upon hours of reading one of literature's most famous storytellers!

CONTENTS
The Novels
THE GILDED AGE: A TALE OF TODAY
THE ADVENTURES OF TOM SAWYER
THE PRINCE AND THE PAUPER
ADVENTURES OF HUCKLEBERRY FINN
and many more!

The Short Stories (too many to list!)
CHRONOLOGICAL LIST OF SHORT STORIES
ALPHABETICAL LIST OF SHORT STORIES
MARK TWAIN'S LIBRARY OF HUMOR

The Essays and Satires
LIST OF TWAIN'S ESSAYS AND SATIRES

The Travel Writing
THE INNOCENTS ABROAD
ROUGHING IT
A TRAMP ABROAD
FOLLOWING THE EQUATOR
SOME RAMBLING NOTES OF AN IDLE EXCURSION

The Non-Fiction
OLD TIMES ON THE MISSISSIPPI
and many more!

The Letters
THE COMPLETE LETTERS OF MARK TWAIN

The Speeches
THE COMPLETE SPEECHES

The Criticism
MARK TWAIN BY ARCHIBALD HENDERSON
MARK TWAIN BY BRANDER MATTHEWS
THE AMERICANS BY DAVID CHRISTIE MURRAY
MARK TWAIN BY FREDERICK WADDY
NEW YORK TIMES ARTICLES

The Biographies
CHAPTERS FROM MY AUTOBIOGRAPHY BY M.TWAIN
MY MARK TWAIN BY WILLIAM DEAN HOWELLS
MARK TWAIN A BIOGRAPHY BY A.B. PAINE
THE BOYS' LIFE OF MARK TWAIN BY A. B. PAINE
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