Narrative of Sojourner Truth: A Northern Slave

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Narrative of Sojourner Truth: A Northern Slave was written in the year 1850 by Sojourner Truth. This book is one of the most popular novels of Sojourner Truth, and has been translated into several other languages around the world.

This book is published by Booklassic which brings young readers closer to classic literature globally.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Booklassic
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Published on
Jul 7, 2015
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Pages
85
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ISBN
9789635269068
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Artists, Architects, Photographers
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Sojourner Truth (c. 1797 – 1883) was an African-American abolitionist and women's rights activist. Truth was born into slavery in Swartekill, Ulster County, New York, but escaped with her infant daughter to freedom in 1826. After going to court to recover her son, in 1828 she became the first black woman to win such a case against a white man. Truth started dictating her memoirs to her friend Olive Gilbert, and in 1850 William Lloyd Garrison privately published her book, The Narrative of Sojourner Truth: A Northern Slave. Ain't I a Woman? (1851) is Truth's best-known speech was delivered extemporaneously, in 1851, at the Ohio Women's Rights Convention in Akron. Contents: The Narrative of Sojourner Truth Her Birth and Parentage Accommodations Her Brothers and Sisters Her Religious Instruction The Auction Death of Mau-mau Bett Last Days of Bomefree Death of Bomefree Commencement of Isabella's Trials in Life Trials Continued Her Standing With Her New Master and Mistress Isabella's Marriage Isabella as a Mother Slaveholder's Promises Her Escape Illegal Sale of Her Son It Is Often Darkest Just Before Dawn Death of Mrs. Eliza Fowler Isabella's Religious Experience New Trials My Dear and Beloved Mother Finding a Brother and Sister Gleanings The Matthias Delusion Fasting The Cause of Her Leaving the City The Consequences of Refusing a Traveller a Night's Lodging Some of Her Views and Reasonings The Second Advent Doctrines Another Camp Meeting Her Last Interview With Her Master Certificates of Character Ain't I a Woman?
The #1 New York Times bestseller from Walter Isaacson brings Leonardo da Vinci to life in this exciting new biography that is “a study in creativity: how to define it, how to achieve it…Most important, it is a powerful story of an exhilarating mind and life” (The New Yorker).

Based on thousands of pages from Leonardo da Vinci’s astonishing notebooks and new discoveries about his life and work, Walter Isaacson “deftly reveals an intimate Leonardo” (San Francisco Chronicle) in a narrative that connects his art to his science. He shows how Leonardo’s genius was based on skills we can improve in ourselves, such as passionate curiosity, careful observation, and an imagination so playful that it flirted with fantasy.

He produced the two most famous paintings in history, The Last Supper and the Mona Lisa. With a passion that sometimes became obsessive, he pursued innovative studies of anatomy, fossils, birds, the heart, flying machines, botany, geology, and weaponry. He explored the math of optics, showed how light rays strike the cornea, and produced illusions of changing perspectives in The Last Supper. His ability to stand at the crossroads of the humanities and the sciences, made iconic by his drawing of Vitruvian Man, made him history’s most creative genius.

In the “luminous” (Daily Beast) Leonardo da Vinci, Isaacson describes how Leonardo’s delight at combining diverse passions remains the ultimate recipe for creativity. So, too, does his ease at being a bit of a misfit: illegitimate, gay, vegetarian, left-handed, easily distracted, and at times heretical. His life should remind us of the importance to be imaginative and, like talented rebels in any era, to think different. Here, da Vinci “comes to life in all his remarkable brilliance and oddity in Walter Isaacson’s ambitious new biography…a vigorous, insightful portrait” (The Washington Post).
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