Aquinas Ethicus: The Moral Teaching of St. Thomas, Vol. 1: Volume 1

Jazzybee Verlag
1
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St. Thomas is not only the king of theologians, but the prince of moralists, and it has seemed a pity that his own words on matters of daily practice should have been so long inaccessible to the English reader. Technical Latin is not attractive to those who are unversed in it, and the student of ethics might be easily bewildered by the large admixture of speculative theology in the Summa.
In this translation the separation of ethics from theology has been carried out in the main, and the English has been made as simple as the subject-matter permits. This is volume one out of two and a a translation of the principal portions of the second part of the Summa Theologica including more than three hundred endnotes.
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Publisher
Jazzybee Verlag
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Published on
Oct 17, 2016
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Pages
390
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ISBN
9783849648305
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Language
English
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Genres
Religion / Christian Theology / Ethics
Religion / Ethics
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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The Summa Theologiae (Latin: Compendium of Theology or Theological Compendium; also subsequently called the Summa Theologica or simply the Summa, written 1265-1274) is the best-known work of Thomas Aquinas (c.1225-1274), and although unfinished, "one of the classics of the history of philosophy and one of the most influential works of Western literature." It is intended as a manual for beginners in theology and a compendium of all of the main theological teachings of the Church. It presents the reasoning for almost all points of Christian theology in the West. The Summa's topics follow a cycle: the existence of God; Creation, Man; Man's purpose; Christ; the Sacraments; and back to God. (courtesy of wikipedia.com). This is part 1-2, 'Pars Prima Secundae'. In a chain of acts of will, man strives for the highest end. They are free acts, insofar as man has in himself the knowledge of their end (and therein the principle of action). In that the will wills the end, it wills also the appropriate means, chooses freely and completes the consensus. Whether the act be good or evil depends on the end. The "human reason" pronounces judgment concerning the character of the end; it is, therefore, the law for action. Human acts, however, are meritorious insofar as they promote the purpose of God and his honor. By repeating a good action, man acquires a moral habit or a quality which enables him to do the good gladly and easily. This is true, however, only of the intellectual and moral virtues (which Aquinas treats after the manner of Aristotle); the theological virtues are imparted by God to man as a "disposition", from which the acts here proceed; while they strengthen, they do not form it. The "disposition" of evil is the opposite alternative. An act becomes evil through deviation from the reason, and from divine moral law.
The Summa Theologiae (Latin: Compendium of Theology or Theological Compendium; also subsequently called the Summa Theologica or simply the Summa, written 1265-1274) is the best-known work of Thomas Aquinas (c.1225-1274), and although unfinished, "one of the classics of the history of philosophy and one of the most influential works of Western literature." It is intended as a manual for beginners in theology and a compendium of all of the main theological teachings of the Church. It presents the reasoning for almost all points of Christian theology in the West. The Summa's topics follow a cycle: the existence of God; Creation, Man; Man's purpose; Christ; the Sacraments; and back to God. (courtesy of wikipedia.com). This is part 1, 'Prima Pars'. Aquinas's greatest work was the Summa, and it is the fullest presentation of his views. He worked on it from the time of Clement IV (after 1265) until the end of his life. When he died, he had reached Question 90 of Part III (on the subject of penance). What was lacking was added afterwards from the fourth book of his commentary on the Sentences of Peter Lombard as a supplementum, which is not found in manuscripts of the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries. The Summa was translated into Greek (apparently by Maximus Planudes around 1327), Armenian, many European languages, and Chinese. It consists of three parts. Part I treats of God, who is the "first cause, himself uncaused" (primum movens immobile) and as such existent only in act (actu) - that is, pure actuality without potentiality, and therefore without corporeality. His essence is actus purus et perfectus. This follows from the fivefold proof for the existence of God; namely, there must be a first mover, unmoved, a first cause in the chain of causes, an absolutely necessary being, an absolutely perfect being, and a rational designer.
The essentials of Catholic doctrine
— clearly and succinctly presented

Two years before he died, St. Thomas Aquinas — probably the greatest teacher the Church has ever known — was asked by his assistant, Brother Reginald, to write a simple summary of the Faith of the Catholic Church for those who lacked the time or the stamina to tackle his massive Summa Theologica.

In response, the great saint quickly set down — in language that non-scholars can understand — his peerless insights into the major topics of theology: the Trinity, Divine Providence, the Incarnation of Christ, the Last Judgment, and much more.

Here, then, is not only St. Thomas’s concise statement of the key elements of his thought, but a handy reference source for the essential truths of the Catholic Faith.

"A gem, a precious pearl, a masterpiece!”
Peter Kreeft
Fundamentals of the Faith

“Thomas Aquinas at his clearest and best.
A treasure.”
Ralph McInerny
First Glance at Thomas Aquinas

“An invaluable introduction to
St. Thomas’s wisdom and insight.”
Edward Cardinal Egan
Archbishop of New York

St. Thomas will show you:

Why faith is reasonable, not blind
Why evil can never be as powerful as good
Solid arguments for Christ’s Resurrection
Powerful arguments for God’s existence
Why angels are necessary in creation
How Adam’s sin differed from Eve’s
Why Jesus descended into Hell
Why we must suffer for Adam’s sin
Why the truths that you can know
only through Revelation are nevertheless rational
Startling details about God’s forgiveness
Facts about the punishment of the damned:
both spiritual and bodily
How a soul’s damnation can be
compatible with God’s goodness
What Christians should think
about “fate” and “chance”
What life after resurrection will be like
Three ways in which God is in all things
Eternal life: what it is; how to understand it
How you can know God through reason
Hell-fire: whether it’s real or symbolic
Why God became man
Why God allows evil
How Jesus “grew in wisdom”
How Christ can have existed for all eternity
and yet be God’s Son
The Beatific Vision: what it really is
Why God’s knowledge of the future
doesn’t deny man’s free will
How the Holy Trinity is three
distinct Persons, yet one God
Much more that will help you know
and love God with greater understanding!

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