Blue Rage, Black Redemption: A Memoir

Sold by Simon and Schuster
98
Free sample

A gripping tale of personal revolution by a man who went from Crips co-founder to Nobel Peace Prize nominee, author, and antigang activist

When his L.A. neighborhood was threatened by gangbangers, Stanley Tookie Williams and a friend formed the Crips, but what began as protection became worse than the original gangs. From deadly street fights with their rivals to drive-by shootings and stealing cars, the Crips' influence -- and Tookie's reputation -- began to spread across L.A. Soon he was regularly under police surveillance, and, as a result, was arrested often, though always released because the charges did not stick. But in 1981, Tookie was convicted of murdering four people and was sent to death row at San Quentin in Marin County, California.

Tookie maintained his innocence and began to work in earnest to prevent others from following his path. Whether he was creating nationwide peace protocols, discouraging adolescents from joining gangs, or writing books, Tookie worked tirelessly for the rest of his life to end gang violence. Even after his death, his legacy continues, supported by such individuals as Archbishop Desmond Tutu, Snoop Dogg, Jesse Jackson, and many more.

This posthumous edition of Blue Rage, Black Redemption features a foreword by Tavis Smiley and an epilogue by Barbara Becnel, which details not only the influence of Tookie's activism but also her eyewitness account of his December 2005 execution, and the inquest that followed.

By turns frightening and enlightening, Blue Rage, Black Redemption is a testament to the strength of the human spirit and an invaluable lesson in how rage can be turned into redemption.
Read more
Collapse

More by Stanley Williams

See more
This true, up-close account of a volcano’s eruption “artfully blends science writing and history with pure, heart-pounding action” (Mark Bowden, bestselling author of Black Hawk Down).
 
In 1993, Stanley Williams, an eminent volcanologist, was standing on top of a Colombian volcano called Galeras when it erupted, killing six of his colleagues instantly. As Williams tried to escape the blast, he was pelted with white-hot projectiles traveling faster than bullets. Within seconds he was cut down, his skull fractured, his right leg almost severed, his backpack aflame. Williams lay helpless and near death on Galeras’s flank until two brave women—friends and fellow volcanologists—mounted an astonishing rescue effort to carry him safely off the mountain.
 
Surviving Galeras is both a harrowing first-person account of an eruption and its aftermath, and a look at the fascinating, high-risk world of volcanology, exploring the profound impact volcanoes have had on the earth’s landscapes and civilizations.
 
Even with improved, highly-sensitive measuring tools and protective equipment, at least one volcanologist, on average, dies each year. This book reveals how Williams and his fellow scientist-adventurers continue to unveil the enigmatic and miraculous workings of volcanoes and piece together methods to predict their actions—potentially saving many human lives.
 
“I thoroughly enjoyed this excellent book . . . [A] riveting story.” —Dava Sobel, author of The Glass Universe
 
“Popular science at its best.” —The New York Times
 
“[A] page-turner.” —Booklist
 
4.7
98 total
Loading...

Additional Information

Publisher
Simon and Schuster
Read more
Collapse
Published on
Nov 13, 2007
Read more
Collapse
Pages
416
Read more
Collapse
ISBN
9781416554301
Read more
Collapse
Read more
Collapse
Read more
Collapse
Language
English
Read more
Collapse
Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Cultural, Ethnic & Regional / General
Biography & Autobiography / Personal Memoirs
Biography & Autobiography / Social Activists
Read more
Collapse
Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
Read more
Collapse
Eligible for Family Library

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.
IN 2005, I received an e-mail from Jesse De La Cruz asking me to read some of his memoir in progress. I told him to send me ten pages. The author Richard Rodriguez read and edited my writings, and introduced me to editors in the early stages of my writing career. He charged me to one day do the same for some other aspiring writer when I had the chance. I told Jesse that I was on deadline but would read his mate-rial and respond within two weeks. Later that day I had an un-expected break, so I decided to read the introduction to his memoir. His story intrigued me. It was clear that Jesse was a nat-ural storyteller. I e¬mailed him and asked him to send me ten more pages. After I read them, I phoned him and told him that I admired his work. Jesse had written the bulk of his memoir before he approached me. I was impressed. He was madly self-driven and needed to write his story, this much was evident. Like all great memoirists I know, Jesse needed to tell his story. To make us see his life as some sort of text that we could learn from. And why not? His story is a powerfully inspiring one. Both for the way he lived so strongly on the other side of taboo, and also for how bravely he has constructed an honest life for himself and his daughter in daylight, out of the shadows. In this memoir, you will learn that violence and rage are trained behavior more often than not. Humans are not born monsters, but can learn to behave monstrously after years of pressures on their poise, through the various physical, racial and psychological abuses as are catalogued in so many sociology textbooks. But Jesse doesn’t promote victim chic. He accepts responsibility for his actions and there¬fore his book lacks the sentimentality that so often hurts the writing of folks who lived to write about surviving prison and the mean streets. Jesse is starkly candid about his behavior in the criminal world. And that is the power of the story. The redemption of Jesse De La Cruz is almost Biblical is scope; an epic story of a life gone wildly astray; a Prodigal Son -- like squandering of intelligence and good will. Milton would recognize this story as one of sin and a heroic life re-gained. St. Paul - an admitted great slave to sin who eventually repented - would know this story of resurrection, and survival of several imprisonments. And of course, there is the 4th century memoirist St. Augustine who confessed his sins and chronicled his spiritual awakening in the most famous memoir in Western Civilization. In my opinion, Jesse De La Cruz’s memoir is a 21st Century addition to this long tradition of stories about detours and recoveries. The question for you the reader, is a riddle: Do you review the life of Jesse De La Cruz through the eyes of a forward-looking boy habituated to hate and violence, who eventually disappeared into the underworld for three decades? Or do we review his narrative from the vantage point of the present, looking back through the eyes of a man, severely mindful as he lives a moral life today? In other words, is Jesse De La Cruz a long time bad man done good in the end? Or is he a good man who acted against his conscience for many years? I prefer to see him the second way. But you judge for yourself. Your journey in the coming pages will reveal Jesse De La Cruz’s compelling life confronting every squalid day with the same first intensity that he confronted his sublime and thorough change.
By turns harrowing, moving, and ultimately redemptive, this is a war story -- a war that rages out of control on the streets of the United States, claiming the lives of our loved ones and neighbors. In this memoir, complete with child soldiers, unspeakable violence, and eventual salvation, we witness the journey of an East Coast member of the notorious Bloods gang coming to terms with the lost boy he was and the transformation into the man he wants to become.

Unlike the child warriors of Mozambique and Sierra Leone, gang members and the wars they wage are the United States' homegrown nightmare. Lacking protection, support, or any alternatives, Dashaun Morris is forced into battle for the first time at age eleven, in the streets of Phoenix, when a friend's older brothers put him in a car filled with 40s and weed smoke, put a gun in his hands, then make him point it at the men on the corner and squeeze the trigger. The targets are Crips, of course, and, as Morris writes, "In the darkness of the streets, my childhood is murdered.... I am reborn -- a gangster."

In this haunting, violent memoir, Morris takes us through an American childhood turned grotesquely inside out. In the fourth grade, he loses his first friend in a drive-by shooting. By high school he is the man, a champion on the football field by day and a reputable banger on his 'hood turf by night.

Living the life of a gang banger, Morris does it all -- drug dealing, jacking, and continuing the aimless war with rival gang members -- almost opening fire one night on a close friend, a cheerleader, as she hangs out with young men he mistakes for Crips.

He eventually makes it to college on a football scholarship, but on the verge of being drafted by the NFL, Morris can't escape his gang-banging mentality and gets caught up in crimes that snatch away all future hopes. Sitting in a prison cell, he anticipates the birth of his first child while counting the friends he's buried.

War of the Bloods in My Veins is part of Morris's redemption, a cry to his brothers that gang life is mental illness. It is a rare and brutally honest look into the relentless storm of abandonment, violence, crime, death, and the endless rush toward the complete and utter self-annihilation that plagues the lives of the young "soldiers" who die every day in our streets.
This true, up-close account of a volcano’s eruption “artfully blends science writing and history with pure, heart-pounding action” (Mark Bowden, bestselling author of Black Hawk Down).
 
In 1993, Stanley Williams, an eminent volcanologist, was standing on top of a Colombian volcano called Galeras when it erupted, killing six of his colleagues instantly. As Williams tried to escape the blast, he was pelted with white-hot projectiles traveling faster than bullets. Within seconds he was cut down, his skull fractured, his right leg almost severed, his backpack aflame. Williams lay helpless and near death on Galeras’s flank until two brave women—friends and fellow volcanologists—mounted an astonishing rescue effort to carry him safely off the mountain.
 
Surviving Galeras is both a harrowing first-person account of an eruption and its aftermath, and a look at the fascinating, high-risk world of volcanology, exploring the profound impact volcanoes have had on the earth’s landscapes and civilizations.
 
Even with improved, highly-sensitive measuring tools and protective equipment, at least one volcanologist, on average, dies each year. This book reveals how Williams and his fellow scientist-adventurers continue to unveil the enigmatic and miraculous workings of volcanoes and piece together methods to predict their actions—potentially saving many human lives.
 
“I thoroughly enjoyed this excellent book . . . [A] riveting story.” —Dava Sobel, author of The Glass Universe
 
“Popular science at its best.” —The New York Times
 
“[A] page-turner.” —Booklist
 
New York Times bestseller from a member of Oprah's SuperSoul 100. 

An unforgettable memoir of redemption and second chances amidst America's mass incarceration epidemic. 

Shaka Senghor was raised in a middle class neighborhood on Detroit’s east side during the height of the 1980s crack epidemic. An honor roll student and a natural leader, he dreamed of becoming a doctor—but at age 11, his parents' marriage began to unravel, and beatings from his mother worsened, which sent him on a downward spiral. He ran away from home, turned to drug dealing to survive, and ended up in prison for murder at the age of 19, full of anger and despair.      

Writing My Wrongs is the story of what came next. During his nineteen-year incarceration, seven of which were spent in solitary confinement, Senghor discovered literature, meditation, self-examination, and the kindness of others—tools he used to confront the demons of his past, forgive the people who hurt him, and begin atoning for the wrongs he had committed. Upon his release at age thirty-eight, Senghor became an activist and mentor to young men and women facing circumstances like his. His work in the community and the courage to share his story led him to fellowships at the MIT Media Lab and the Kellogg Foundation and invitations to speak at events like TED and the Aspen Ideas Festival.

In equal turns, Writing My Wrongs is a page-turning portrait of life in the shadow of poverty, violence, and fear; an unforgettable story of redemption and a compelling witness to our country’s need for rethinking its approach to crime, prison, and the men and women sent there.
©2019 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google|Location: United StatesLanguage: English (United States)
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.