Saving Stalin's Imperial City: Historic Preservation in Leningrad, 1930–1950

Indiana University Press
Free sample

Saving Stalin’s Imperial City is the history of the successes and failures in historic preservation and of Leningraders’ determination to honor the memory of the terrible siege the city had endured during World War II. The book stresses the counterintuitive nature of Stalinist policies, which allocated scarce wartime resources to save historic monuments of the tsarist and imperial past even as the very existence of the Soviet state was being threatened, and again after the war, when housing, hospitals, and schools needed to be rebuilt. Postwar Leningrad was at the forefront of a concerted restoration effort, fueled by commemorations that glorified the city’s wartime experience, encouraged civic pride, and mobilized residents to rebuild their hometown. For Leningrad, the restoration of monuments and commemorations of the siege were intimately intertwined, served similar purposes, and were mutually reinforcing.
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About the author

Steven Maddox is Assistant Professor of History at Canisius College.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Indiana University Press
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Published on
Dec 18, 2014
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Pages
296
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ISBN
9780253014894
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Modern / 20th Century
History / Russia & the Former Soviet Union
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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A magisterial, richly detailed history of the Kremlin, and of the centuries of Russian elites who have shaped it—and been shaped by it in turn

The Moscow Kremlin is the heart of the Russian state, a fortress whose blood-red walls have witnessed more than eight hundred years of political drama and extraordinary violence. It has been the seat of a priestly monarchy, a worldly church and the Soviet Union; it has served as a crossroads for diplomacy, trade, and espionage; it has survived earthquakes, devastating fires, and at least three revolutions. Its very name is a byword for enduring power. From Ivan the Terrible to Vladimir Putin, generations of Russian leaders have sought to use the Kremlin to legitimize their vision of statehood.

Drawing on a dazzling array of sources from hitherto unseen archives and rare collections, renowned historian Catherine Merridale traces the full history of this enigmatic fortress. The Kremlin has inspired innumerable myths, but no invented tales could be more dramatic than the operatic successions and savage betrayals that took place within its vast compound of palaces and cathedrals. Today, its sumptuous golden crosses and huge electric red stars blaze side by side as the Kremlin fulfills its centuries-old role, linking the country's recent history to its distant past and proclaiming the eternal continuity of the Russian state.
More than an absorbing history of Russia's most famous landmark, Red Fortress uses the Kremlin as a unique lens, bringing into focus the evolution of Russia's culture and the meaning of its politics.

The dacha is a sometimes beloved, sometimes scorned Russian dwelling. Alexander Pushkin summered in one; Joseph Stalin lived in one for the last twenty years of his life; and contemporary Russian families still escape the city to spend time in them. Stephen Lovell's generously illustrated book is the first social and cultural history of the dacha. Lovell traces the dwelling's origins as a villa for the court elite in the early eighteenth century through its nineteenth-century role as the emblem of a middle-class lifestyle, its place under communist rule, and its post-Soviet incarnation.A fascinating work rich in detail, Summerfolk explores the ways in which Russia's turbulent past has shaped the function of the dacha and attitudes toward it. The book also demonstrates the crucial role that the dacha has played in the development of Russia's two most important cities, Moscow and St. Petersburg, by providing residents with a refuge from the squalid and crowded metropolis. Like the suburbs in other nations, the dacha form of settlement served to alleviate social anxieties about urban growth. Lovell shows that the dacha is defined less by its physical location"usually one or two hours" distance from a large city yet apart from the rural hinterland—than by the routines, values, and ideologies of its inhabitants.Drawing on sources as diverse as architectural pattern books, memoirs, paintings, fiction, and newspapers, he examines how dachniki ("summerfolk") have freed themselves from the workplace, cultivated domestic space, and created informal yet intense intellectual communities. He also reflects on the disdain that many Russians have felt toward the dacha, and their association of its lifestyle with physical idleness, private property, and unproductive use of the land. Russian attitudes toward the dacha are, Lovell asserts, constantly evolving. The word "dacha" has evoked both delight in and hostility to leisure. It has implied both the rejection of agricultural labor and, more recently, a return to the soil. In Summerfolk, the dacha is a unique vantage point from which to observe the Russian social landscape and Russian life in the private sphere.
Lost San Francisco takes readers on a journey back to the buildings, parks, stadia, ferries - even cemetaries and prisoners - that time and progress have swept aside. It revisits the building where fortunes were made, where momentous events unfolded and where San Franciscans went to enjoy themselves, like Seals Stadium or Playland at the Beach. The single biggest moment of loss occurred on April 18, 1906, when the great earthquake that rocked so many foundations was followed by a calamitous fire. It ripped through Chinatown and Nob Hill, treating immigrant business and plutocrat mansion alike. it spawned a wave of new building, turned some cable card to electric streetcars and moved Chinatown towards Porthmouth Square. Elsewhere, Fillmore lost its illuminated arches to wartime expediency, the Palace of Fine Arts succumbed to fifty years of water damage and two Cliff houses, the Fillmore Chutes and buildings and Angel Island went up in flames. The Bay Bridge and the Golden Gate Bridge made the ferries redundant, while the automobile also accounted for the Southern Pacific station. Organized chronologically from the date of loss, Lost San Francisco is a rich archive of vanished institutions and communities, full or remarkable buildings and the remarkable stories of the men an women who contributed to the city's rich and colourful past. Eric J. Kos and Dennis Evanosky are publishers of the Alameda Sun, a weekly newspaper across the Bay from San Francisco. Eric wrote for and designed various publications before forming the Sun's parent company, Stellar Media Group, Inc. in 2001. Dennis and Eric are co-authors of San Francisco Then and Now, East Bay Then and Now, San Francisco in Photographs and Los Angeles from the Air Then and Now. They have written and published three other books about the history of Oakland and Alameda.
Like a parallel universe, an entire city could be formed with the lost buildings of New York Citys past. Lost New York is a walk through this virtual metropolis. More than an architectural tour, it is a fascinating view of the citys ever-changing landscape and way of life, from magnificent buildings like Penn Station and the glorious mansions of the Gilded Age to trolleys, diners, racetracks and baseball parks that now exist only in photographs. Filled with intriguing photographs on every page, the book illustrates both the citys distant and recent past, from the mid-nineteenth century through the first decade of the twenty-first. It follows a chronology of constant change, charting the years when the major features of the city were destroyed, altered or abandoned. Forests of tall-masted ships, horse-drawn carriages and massive train terminals gave way to cars and trucks. Dazzling amusement parks and luxurious resorts in Coney Island, the great Worlds Fair of 1939, rock n roll palaces, and many romantic features of Central Park are now only memories. Buildings that have become icons of the New York cityscape hide an earlier history, like that of the first Waldorf-Astoria, the worlds largest and most opulent hotel that once stood on the site of the Empire State Building. These lost places are interwoven with engrossing stories of the multi-millionaires, robber barons, artists, engineers and entrepreneurs who shaped New York. They are a record of historic events, of disasters like the sinking of the Normandie at a Manhattan pier, and the world-shaking tragedy of the World Trade Center. The dynamic forces that created New York left a trail of memorable yet neglected history as amazing as the city today. Rediscover it in Lost New York. Author Information Marcia Reiss is the author of seven books about New York history and architecture including the best-selling New York Then and Now. Her most recent works include New York City at Night and Central Park Then and Now, as well as a series of guides to historic Brooklyn neighbourhoods. She was Policy Director of the Parks Council, now New Yorkers for Parks, and previousy Public Affairs Director for the New York City Department of Ports and Trade. She also taught at Columbia University and Hunter College, and was a reporter for the Brooklyn Phoenix and the Seafarer's Log. She and her husband have lived in several buildings in Manhattan and Brooklyn as old as the ones in Lost New York. Fortunately, non are lost. They now live in an 1840s farmhouse in upstate New York.
NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER

Journalist Adam Higginbotham’s definitive, years-in-the-making account of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant disaster—and a powerful investigation into how propaganda, secrecy, and myth have obscured the true story of one of the twentieth century’s greatest disasters.

Early in the morning of April 26, 1986, Reactor Number Four of the Chernobyl Atomic Energy Station exploded, triggering history’s worst nuclear disaster. In the thirty years since then, Chernobyl has become lodged in the collective nightmares of the world: shorthand for the spectral horrors of radiation poisoning, for a dangerous technology slipping its leash, for ecological fragility, and for what can happen when a dishonest and careless state endangers its citizens and the entire world. But the real story of the accident, clouded from the beginning by secrecy, propaganda, and misinformation, has long remained in dispute.

Drawing on hundreds of hours of interviews conducted over the course of more than ten years, as well as letters, unpublished memoirs, and documents from recently-declassified archives, Adam Higginbotham has written a harrowing and compelling narrative which brings the disaster to life through the eyes of the men and women who witnessed it firsthand. The result is a masterful nonfiction thriller, and the definitive account of an event that changed history: a story that is more complex, more human, and more terrifying than the Soviet myth.

Midnight in Chernobyl is an indelible portrait of one of the great disasters of the twentieth century, of human resilience and ingenuity, and the lessons learned when mankind seeks to bend the natural world to his will—lessons which, in the face of climate change and other threats, remain not just vital but necessary.
New York Times bestseller

THE BOOK THAT EXPLAINS WHY RUSSIANS WANTED TO MEET WITH THE TRUMP CAMPAIGN

“Part John Grisham-like thriller, part business and political memoir.” —The New York Times

“[Red Notice] does for investing in Russia and the former Soviet Union what Liar’s Poker did for our understanding of Salomon Brothers, Wall Street, and the mortgage-backed securities business in the 1980s. Browder’s business saga meshes well with the story of corruption and murder in Vladimir Putin’s Russia, making Red Notice an early candidate for any list of the year’s best books” (Fortune).

This is a story about an accidental activist. Bill Browder started out his adult life as the Wall Street maverick whose instincts led him to Russia just after the breakup of the Soviet Union, where he made his fortune.

Along the way he exposed corruption, and when he did, he barely escaped with his life. His Russian lawyer Sergei Magnitsky wasn’t so lucky: he ended up in jail, where he was tortured to death. That changed Browder forever. He saw the murderous heart of the Putin regime and has spent the last half decade on a campaign to expose it. Because of that, he became Putin’s number one enemy, especially after Browder succeeded in having a law passed in the United States—The Magnitsky Act—that punishes a list of Russians implicated in the lawyer’s murder. Putin famously retaliated with a law that bans Americans from adopting Russian orphans.

A financial caper, a crime thriller, and a political crusade, Red Notice is the story of one man taking on overpowering odds to change the world, and also the story of how, without intending to, he found meaning in his life.
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