Morning Report

Dreamspinner Press
11

Morning Report: Book One

A decade on from their first kiss, Luke Murray is more in love with Simon every day. Running the Lost Cow ranch for Luke’s parents, they keep their heads down and get along with the locals, even if Luke is known for being a hothead. Then one day they discover the local store owners refuse to serve them.

They’re bewildered until Luke’s mom tells them the new pastor has targeted the couple in his sermons. Suddenly Luke and Simon find themselves alienated from people they called friends, and their ranch comes under a series of attacks. As the town’s hatred and homophobia turns on them, Luke and Simon will face a critical choice: give in to the town’s demands and disappear, or stand and fight for themselves and their love.

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4.4
11 total
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Additional Information

Publisher
Dreamspinner Press
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Published on
Jan 7, 2011
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Pages
220
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ISBN
9781615816781
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Language
English
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Genres
Fiction / Romance / LGBT / Gay
Fiction / Romance / Western
Fiction / Westerns
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Content Protection
This content is DRM free.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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