My Journey from an Asian British to British Asian

Troubador Publishing Ltd
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My Journey from an Asian British to British Asian covers Sujit Bhattacharjee’s life, from his early years in India to one of the first generation of post-war Indian immigrants living in the UK over the last 50 years.
Over the course of his time in the UK, Sujit has witnessed a drastic change in its nature and composition. Upon arrival, Britain was a predominantly Anglo-Saxon Christian society, but has been transformed into the diverse, open-minded and multiculturally enriched nation we live in today.
Sujit has also noticed a shift in his own cultural identities since becoming resident in Britain. He began subscribing to the view that one’s identities could be multiple and situational; both British and Asian.
Sujit’s story was originally written for his own children and grandchildren, who were keen to know how and why he came to live in the UK, and how it helped him become the man he is today. However, it will also be of interest to second and third generation readers of Indian descent who are keen to learn more of their own heritage, as well as to the general British public as it dwells on the dilemma of a hybrid immigrant in this country.
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About the author

Sujit Bhattacharjee enjoyed a long and successful career as an academic and civil servant. Now retired, he is based in Middlesex and and is a writer and speaker on many cultural and socio-political issues.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Troubador Publishing Ltd
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Published on
Nov 28, 2017
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Pages
200
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ISBN
9781788033916
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Cultural, Ethnic & Regional / General
Biography & Autobiography / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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