Beasts of Burden: Animal and Disability Liberation

The New Press
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A beautifully written, deeply provocative inquiry into the intersection of animal and disability liberation—and the debut of an important new social critic

How much of what we understand of ourselves as "human" depends on our physical and mental abilities—how we move (or cannot move) in and interact with the world? And how much does our definition of "human" depend on its difference from "animal"?

Drawing on her own experiences as a disabled person, a disability activist, and an animal advocate, author Sunaura Taylor persuades us to think deeply, and sometimes uncomfortably, about what divides the human from the animal, the disabled from the nondisabled—and what it might mean to break down those divisions, to claim the animal and the vulnerable in ourselves, in a process she calls "cripping animal ethics."

Beasts of Burden suggests that issues of disability and animal justice, which have heretofore primarily been presented in opposition, are in fact deeply entangled. Fusing philosophy, memoir, and science—including factory farming, disability oppression, and our assumptions of human superiority over animals—Taylor draws attention to new worlds of experience and empathy that will open up important avenues of solidarity across species and ability. Beasts of Burden is a wonderfully engaging and elegantly written work, both philosophical and personal, by a brilliant debut author.
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About the author

Sunaura Taylor is an artist and writer based in New York City. She has written for AlterNet, American Quarterly, BOMB, the Monthly Review, Qui Parle, and Yes! Magazine. She has contributed to the books Ecofeminism, Defiant Daughters, Occupy!, Stay Solid, and Infinite City. Taylor and Judith Butler’s conversation is featured in the film Examined Life and the book of the same name, published by The New Press.
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Additional Information

Publisher
The New Press
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Published on
Mar 7, 2017
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Pages
272
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ISBN
9781620971291
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Language
English
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Genres
Nature / Animal Rights
Social Science / People with Disabilities
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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