Hurricane Katrina and the Forgotten Coast of Mississippi

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Hurricane Katrina slammed into the Gulf Coast in August 2005 with devastating consequences. Almost all analyses of the disaster have been dedicated to the way the hurricane affected New Orleans. This volume examines the impact of Katrina on southern Mississippi. While communities along Mississippi's Gulf Coast shared the impact, their socioeconomic and demographic compositions varied widely, leading to different types and rates of recovery. This volume furthers our understanding of the pace of recovery and its geographic extent, and explores the role of inequalities in the recovery process and those antecedent conditions that could give rise to a 'recovery divide'. It will be especially appealing to researchers and advanced students of natural disasters and policy makers dealing with disaster consequences and recovery.
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About the author

Susan L. Cutter is Carolina Distinguished Professor of Geography at the University of South Carolina and Director of the Hazards and Vulnerability Research Institute. Her primary research interests are in the area of hazard vulnerability/resilience science. She has authored or edited 12 books and more than 150 peer-reviewed articles and book chapters. Dr Cutter serves on many national and international advisory boards and committees, including the US National Research Council, US National Science Foundation, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, and the Science Committee of the Integrated Research on Disaster Risk Program. She is an executive editor of Environment and associate editor for Weather, Climate, and Society. In 2010, Dr Cutter received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Association of American Geographers, and in 2013 she was a recipient of the prestigious Southeastern Conference Faculty Achievement Award. Her most recent book is Hazards, Vulnerability, and Environmental Justice (2006).

Christopher T. Emrich is a Research Assistant Professor in the Hazards and Vulnerability Research Institute at the University of South Carolina. His primary research interests are in the development and application of geospatial technologies in emergency management. He has taught at the University of South Florida and worked for FEMA as a Mitigation GIS Specialist at the Florida Disaster Field Office (2004–5), GIS Unit Leader for the Jackson Mississippi Joint Field Office (2006), GIS Unit Leader for the Florida Long Term Recovery Office (2006–7), and as a geospatial liaison to FEMA headquarters for the New Orleans Gulf Coast Recovery Office during the run-up to the three-year anniversary of Hurricane Katrina.

Jerry T. Mitchell is the Director of the Center of Excellence for Geographic Education and a Research Associate Professor at the Hazards and Vulnerability Research Institute, both at the University of South Carolina. He is also editor of the Journal of Geography. His primary research interests lie in cultural responses to disaster, the use of geospatial technologies for vulnerability assessments, and hazards education. Prior to joining the University of South Carolina faculty in 2004, he was an Associate Professor of Geography at Bloomsburg University. He was awarded a Distinguished Teaching Achievement award from the National Council for Geographic Education in 2012.

Walter W. Piegorsch is the Director of Statistical Research and Education at the University of Arizona's BIO5 Institute. He is also a Professor of Mathematics, Professor of Public Health, and former Chair of the University's Graduate Interdisciplinary Program in Statistics, and he holds accreditation as a Professional Statistician from the American Statistical Association. His research focuses on environmental data analytics, with emphasis on environmental hazards and risk assessment. He is the editor-in-chief of the journal Environmetrics, former joint-editor of the Journal of the American Statistical Association (Theory and Methods Section) and has served on numerous other editorial and scientific review boards. His most recent book is Encyclopedia of Environmetrics, 2nd edition (2012).

Mark M. Smith is Carolina Distinguished Professor of History at the University of South Carolina. A specialist in southern history, race relations and sensory history, he has authored or edited a dozen books, including, most recently, Camille, 1969: Histories of a Hurricane (2011). His work has been featured in The New York Times, The Times, Science, Brain, and the Chronicle of Higher Education. A former president of The Historical Society, Professor Smith has lectured in China, Australia, Europe, and throughout the United States. He regularly reviews books for The Wall Street Journal.

Lynn Weber is a Professor of Psychology and Women's and Gender Studies at the University of South Carolina. For more than thirty years, she has led in developing the field of intersectionality – examining the nexus between race, class, gender, sexuality, and other dimensions of inequality. In addition to her work on the Mississippi Gulf Coast and in conjunction with a national research network on persons displaced by Hurricane Katrina, she and Lori Peek edited Displaced: Life in the Katrina Diaspora (2012).

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Additional Information

Publisher
Cambridge University Press
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Published on
Apr 7, 2014
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Pages
221
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ISBN
9781139867597
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Language
English
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Genres
Law / Environmental
Science / Environmental Science
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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James Salzman
Environmental Law and Policy is a user-friendly, concise, inexpensive treatment of environmental law. Written to be read pleasurably rather than used as a dry reference source, the authors provide a broad conceptual overview of environmental law while also explaining the major statutes and cases. The book is intended for three audiences - students (both graduate and undergraduate) seeking a readable study guide for their environmental law and policy courses; professors who do not use casebooks (relying on their own materials or case studies) but want an integrating text for their courses or want to include conceptual materials on the major legal issues; and practicing lawyers and environmental professionals who want a concise, readable overview of the field. For the fourth edition, to provide students a deeper understanding of how environmental law works in practice, a new Chapter has been written on Enforcement. A series of problem exercises have been added throughout the book, describing a legal or policy conflict in detail and asking students to identify and assess solutions. The first part of the book provides an engaging discussion of the major themes and issues that cross-cut environmental law. Starting with the first chapter's brief history of environmentalism in America, the second chapter goes on to explore the importance and implications of basic themes that occur in virtually all environmental conflicts, including scientific uncertainty, market failures, problems of scale, public choice theory, etc. It then presents three dominant perspectives in the field that drive policy development - environmental rights, utilitarianism, and environmental justice. Chapter Three fills in the remaining legal background for understanding environmental protection, reviewing the theory of instrument choice, the basics of administrative law, core concepts in constitutional law (e.g., takings, the commerce clause), and the doctrines associated with how citizen groups shape environmental law (such as standing). Chapter Four examines the practice and policy of monitoring compliance and enforcing the law. The second part of the book examines the substance of environmental law, with separate sections on each of the major statutes. International issues such as ozone depletion and climate change are also addressed. These chapters build on the themes and conceptual framework laid down in the first part of the text in order to integrate the discussion of individual statutes into a broad portrait of the law. The third part of the book describes natural resources law, discussing endangered species conservation, wetlands protection, water and energy issues. Part four addresses environmental impact statements and the National Environmental Policy Act.
Mark M. Smith
Historical accounts of major events have almost always relied upon what those who were there witnessed. Nowhere is this truer than in the nerve-shattering chaos of warfare, where sight seems to confer objective truth and acts as the basis of reconstruction. In The Smell of Battle, the Taste of Siege, historian Mark M. Smith considers how all five senses, including sight, shaped the experience of the Civil War and thus its memory, exploring its full sensory impact on everyone from the soldiers on the field to the civilians waiting at home. From the eardrum-shattering barrage of shells announcing the outbreak of war at Fort Sumter; to the stench produced by the corpses lying in the mid-summer sun at Gettysburg; to the siege of Vicksburg, once a center of Southern culinary aesthetics and starved into submission, Smith recreates how Civil War was felt and lived. Relying on first-hand accounts, Smith focuses on specific senses, one for each event, offering a wholly new perspective. At Bull Run, the similarities between the colors of the Union and Confederate uniforms created concern over what later would be called "friendly fire" and helped decide the outcome of the first major battle, simply because no one was quite sure they could believe their eyes. He evokes what it might have felt like to be in the HL Hunley submarine, in which eight men worked cheek by jowl in near-total darkness in a space 48 inches high, 42 inches wide. Often argued to be the first "total war," the Civil War overwhelmed the senses because of its unprecedented nature and scope, rendering sight less reliable and, Smith shows, forcefully engaging the nonvisual senses. Sherman's March was little less than a full-blown assault on Southern sense and sensibility, leaving nothing untouched and no one unaffected. Unique, compelling, and fascinating, The Smell of Battle, The Taste of Siege, offers readers way to experience the Civil War with fresh eyes.
Mark M. Smith
Historical accounts of major events have almost always relied upon what those who were there witnessed. Nowhere is this truer than in the nerve-shattering chaos of warfare, where sight seems to confer objective truth and acts as the basis of reconstruction. In The Smell of Battle, the Taste of Siege, historian Mark M. Smith considers how all five senses, including sight, shaped the experience of the Civil War and thus its memory, exploring its full sensory impact on everyone from the soldiers on the field to the civilians waiting at home. From the eardrum-shattering barrage of shells announcing the outbreak of war at Fort Sumter; to the stench produced by the corpses lying in the mid-summer sun at Gettysburg; to the siege of Vicksburg, once a center of Southern culinary aesthetics and starved into submission, Smith recreates how Civil War was felt and lived. Relying on first-hand accounts, Smith focuses on specific senses, one for each event, offering a wholly new perspective. At Bull Run, the similarities between the colors of the Union and Confederate uniforms created concern over what later would be called "friendly fire" and helped decide the outcome of the first major battle, simply because no one was quite sure they could believe their eyes. He evokes what it might have felt like to be in the HL Hunley submarine, in which eight men worked cheek by jowl in near-total darkness in a space 48 inches high, 42 inches wide. Often argued to be the first "total war," the Civil War overwhelmed the senses because of its unprecedented nature and scope, rendering sight less reliable and, Smith shows, forcefully engaging the nonvisual senses. Sherman's March was little less than a full-blown assault on Southern sense and sensibility, leaving nothing untouched and no one unaffected. Unique, compelling, and fascinating, The Smell of Battle, The Taste of Siege, offers readers way to experience the Civil War with fresh eyes.
Mark M. Smith
For at least two centuries, argues Mark Smith, white southerners used all of their senses--not just their eyes--to construct racial difference and define race. His provocative analysis, extending from the colonial period to the mid-twentieth century, shows how whites of all classes used the artificial binary of "black" and "white" to justify slavery and erect the political, legal, and social structure of segregation.

Based on painstaking research, How Race Is Made is a highly original, always frank, and often disturbing book. After enslaved Africans were initially brought to America, the offspring of black and white sexual relationships (consensual and forced) complicated the purely visual sense of racial typing. As mixed-race people became more and more common and as antebellum race-based slavery and then postbellum racial segregation became central to southern society, white southerners asserted that they could rely on their other senses--touch, smell, sound, and taste--to identify who was "white" and who was not. Sensory racial stereotypes were invented and irrational, but at every turn, Smith shows, these constructions of race, immune to logic, signified difference and perpetuated inequality.

Smith argues that the history of southern race relations and the construction of racial difference on which that history is built cannot be understood fully on the basis of sight alone. In order to come to terms with the South's past and present, Smith says, we must explore the sensory dynamics underpinning the deeply emotional construction of race. How Race Is Made takes a bold step toward that understanding.



Mark M. Smith
Historical accounts of major events have almost always relied upon what those who were there witnessed. Nowhere is this truer than in the nerve-shattering chaos of warfare, where sight seems to confer objective truth and acts as the basis of reconstruction. In The Smell of Battle, the Taste of Siege, historian Mark M. Smith considers how all five senses, including sight, shaped the experience of the Civil War and thus its memory, exploring its full sensory impact on everyone from the soldiers on the field to the civilians waiting at home. From the eardrum-shattering barrage of shells announcing the outbreak of war at Fort Sumter; to the stench produced by the corpses lying in the mid-summer sun at Gettysburg; to the siege of Vicksburg, once a center of Southern culinary aesthetics and starved into submission, Smith recreates how Civil War was felt and lived. Relying on first-hand accounts, Smith focuses on specific senses, one for each event, offering a wholly new perspective. At Bull Run, the similarities between the colors of the Union and Confederate uniforms created concern over what later would be called "friendly fire" and helped decide the outcome of the first major battle, simply because no one was quite sure they could believe their eyes. He evokes what it might have felt like to be in the HL Hunley submarine, in which eight men worked cheek by jowl in near-total darkness in a space 48 inches high, 42 inches wide. Often argued to be the first "total war," the Civil War overwhelmed the senses because of its unprecedented nature and scope, rendering sight less reliable and, Smith shows, forcefully engaging the nonvisual senses. Sherman's March was little less than a full-blown assault on Southern sense and sensibility, leaving nothing untouched and no one unaffected. Unique, compelling, and fascinating, The Smell of Battle, The Taste of Siege, offers readers way to experience the Civil War with fresh eyes.
Walter W. Piegorsch
A comprehensive introduction to statistical methods for data mining and knowledge discovery.

Applications of data mining and ‘big data’ increasingly take center stage in our modern, knowledge-driven society, supported by advances in computing power, automated data acquisition, social media development and interactive, linkable internet software. This book presents a coherent, technical introduction to modern statistical learning and analytics, starting from the core foundations of statistics and probability. It includes an overview of probability and statistical distributions, basics of data manipulation and visualization, and the central components of standard statistical inferences. The majority of the text extends beyond these introductory topics, however, to supervised learning in linear regression, generalized linear models, and classification analytics. Finally, unsupervised learning via dimension reduction, cluster analysis, and market basket analysis are introduced.

Extensive examples using actual data (with sample R programming code) are provided, illustrating diverse informatic sources in genomics, biomedicine, ecological remote sensing, astronomy, socioeconomics, marketing, advertising and finance, among many others.

Statistical Data Analytics:

Focuses on methods critically used in data mining and statistical informatics. Coherently describes the methods at an introductory level, with extensions to selected intermediate and advanced techniques. Provides informative, technical details for the highlighted methods. Employs the open-source R language as the computational vehicle – along with its burgeoning collection of online packages – to illustrate many of the analyses contained in the book. Concludes each chapter with a range of interesting and challenging homework exercises using actual data from a variety of informatic application areas.

This book will appeal as a classroom or training text to intermediate and advanced undergraduates, and to beginning graduate students, with sufficient background in calculus and matrix algebra. It will also serve as a source-book on the foundations of statistical informatics and data analytics to practitioners who regularly apply statistical learning to their modern data.

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