Language and Linguistic Diversity in the US: An Introduction

Routledge
1
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This highly engaging textbook presents a linguistic view of the history, society, and culture of the United States. It discusses the many languages and forms of language that have been used in the US – including standard and nonstandard forms of English, creoles, Native American languages, and immigrant languages from across the globe – and shows how this distribution and diversity of languages has helped shape and define America as well as an American identity. The volume introduces the basic concepts of sociolinguistics and the politics of language through cohesive, up-to-date and accessible coverage of such key topics as dialectal development and the role of English as the majority language, controversies concerning language use in society, languages other than English used in the US, and the policies that have directly or indirectly influenced language use.

These topics are presented in such a way that students can examine the inherent diversity of the communicative systems used in the United States as both a form of cultural enrichment and as the basis for socio-political conflict. The author team outlines the different viewpoints on contemporary issues surrounding language in the US and contextualizes these issues within linguistic facts, to help students think critically and formulate logical discussions. To provide opportunities for further examination and debate, chapters are organized around key misconceptions or questions ("I don't have an accent" or "Immigrants don't want to learn English"), bringing them to the forefront for readers to address directly.

Language and Linguistic Diversity in the US is a fresh and unique take on a widely taught topic. It is ideal for students from a variety of disciplines or with no prior knowledge of the field, and a useful text for introductory courses on language in the US, American English, language variation, language ideology, and sociolinguistics.

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About the author

Susan Tamasi is Senior Lecturer and Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Program in Linguistics, Emory University. She has presented at NWAV, AAAL, Sociolinguistics Symposium, and American Dialect Society, Her areas of research include sociolinguistics, language variation, language attitudes, American English, and health communication.

Lamont Antieau is an independent language consultant who has held positions as Research Associate (University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee), Visiting Instructor (Western Carolina University), and Lecturer (Mississippi State University). He has presented at NWAV, American Dialect Society, Southeastern Conference on Linguistics, and International Association of Forensic Linguists. His areas of research include language variation, dialectology, American English, corpus linguistics, and biomedical informatics.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Routledge
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Published on
Dec 2, 2014
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Pages
400
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ISBN
9781136579042
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Language
English
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Genres
Language Arts & Disciplines / General
Language Arts & Disciplines / Linguistics / Historical & Comparative
Language Arts & Disciplines / Linguistics / Sociolinguistics
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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