My Life and Mission

Advaita Ashrama (A publication branch of Ramakrishna Math, Belur Math)
34
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This lecture was delivered by Swami Vivekananda in California. It gives a vivid picture of how his great heart bled for the suffering millions of India, and also his plan for the uplift of his motherland to the position of her past glory. In these pages the reader also finds the great Swami speaking so poignantly about himself, his inner struggle and sorrow. Pubished by Advaita Ashrama, a branch of Ramakrishna Math, Belur Math, India, this book is a must for all those who want to feel the charm and force of Swamiji's thoughts.
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Publisher
Advaita Ashrama (A publication branch of Ramakrishna Math, Belur Math)
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Published on
May 1, 2016
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Pages
31
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ISBN
9788175058347
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Features
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Asia / India & South Asia
Religion / Hinduism / General
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This content is DRM protected.
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A Finalist for the 2018 Los Angeles Times Book Prize in History

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An entertaining and provocative account of India’s past, written by one of the country’s leading thinkers

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Here is the first volume of a magisterial biography of Mohandas Gandhi that gives us the most illuminating portrait we have had of the life, the work and the historical context of one of the most abidingly influential—and controversial—men in modern history.
           
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