Chinese-English Mini Dictionary: How to learn essential Mandarin Chinese words in English for school, exam, and business anywhere with a smartphone or tablet

Core Voca
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This book lists approximately 4,800 core Chinese words with English equivalents including standard American pronunciation.  Main entries are in Pinyin (Romanized standard Chinese pronunciation) alphabetically with Chinese characters (both simplified and traditional if applicable). In the next line, pasts of speech label ([n.] for nouns and [v.] for verbs) and the entry’s English equivalents followed by standard American pronunciation with focus on stressed syllable*in bold print.

A syllable is part of a word that contains one vowel sound. In every word of two or more syllables, one syllable is stressed. It’s called ‘stressed syllable’. The vowel sound in that syllable is louder, higher in pitch, and longer than the other vowel sounds in the same word.

The contrast between stressed and unstressed syllables is very important because it helps to create the rhythm of English. The native English speakers rely more on stressed syllable to understand what you say than on the individual sounds of the word.

This book is ideal for learners of English as a second language who want to communicate more effectively and also for learners of Chinese who know English. 


* Please refer to the website for more information. www.corevoca.com

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Additional Information

Publisher
Core Voca
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Published on
Apr 11, 2018
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Pages
175
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Business & Economics / Education
Foreign Language Study / Chinese
Reference / Dictionaries
Reference / Handbooks & Manuals
Reference / Personal & Practical Guides
Reference / Word Lists
Reference / Writing Skills
Study Aids / College Entrance
Study Aids / Tests
Travel / Asia / China
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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A syllable is part of a word that contains one vowel sound. In every word of two or more syllables, one syllable is stressed. It’s called ‘stressed syllable’. The vowel sound in that syllable is louder, higher in pitch, and longer than the other vowel sounds in the same word.

In this book, stressed syllable is written in larger boldface. (Example: academy [əkædəmi]) Unstressed syllables are often pronounced with the schwa vowel sound (ə). All one syllable words have primary stress when spoken separately. (Examples: big, day)

The contrast between stressed and unstressed syllables is very important because it helps to create the rhythm of English. The native English speakers rely more on stressed syllable to understand what you say than on the individual sounds of the word.

This book lists 16,616 core English words that are divided into 25 vowel categories containing stressed syllables and listed alphabetically within each category. Also the words are divided into three different levels of ESL (English as a Second Language) so that learners can practice pronunciation according to their levels. Level 1 (for elementary & middle school) is written in red, level 2 (for high school) is written in blue, and level 3 (for university and above) is written in black.

Words with same spelling but different stressed syllables or words with same spelling but different pronunciation are differentiated using following parts of speech.

 

[n.] noun   [a.] adjective   [v.] verb

 

This book is ideal for learners of English as a second language who want to communicate more effectively and also for native English speakers who wish to change dialects.


* Please refer to the website for more information. www.corevoca.com

A syllable is part of a word that contains one vowel sound. In every word of two or more syllables, one syllable is stressed. It’s called ‘stressed syllable’. The vowel sound in that syllable is louder, higher in pitch, and longer than the other vowel sounds in the same word.

In this book, stressed syllable is written in larger boldface. (Example: academy [əkædəmi]) Unstressed syllables are often pronounced with the schwa vowel sound (ə). All one syllable words have primary stress when spoken separately. (Examples: big, day)

The contrast between stressed and unstressed syllables is very important because it helps to create the rhythm of English. The native English speakers rely more on stressed syllable to understand what you say than on the individual sounds of the word.

This book lists 16,616 core English words that are listed alphabetically and are divided into three different levels of ESL (English as a Second Language) so that learners can practice pronunciation according to their levels. Level 1 (for elementary & middle school) is written in red, level 2 (for high school) is written in blue, and level 3 (for university and above) is written in black.  

 

Words with same spelling but different stressed syllables or words with same spelling but different pronunciation are differentiated using following parts of speech.

[n.] noun   [a.] adjective   [v.] verb

 

This book is ideal for learners of English as a second language who want to communicate more effectively and also for native English speakers who wish to change dialects.


* Please refer to the website for more information. www.corevoca.com

Eric Bischoff has been called pro wrestling's most hated man. He's been booed, reviled, and burned in effigy. Fans have hurled everything from beer bottles to fists at him. Industry critics have spewed a tremendous amount of venom about his spectacular rise and stupendous crash at World Championship Wrestling. But even today, Eric Bischoff's revolutionary influence on the pro wrestling industry can be seen on every television show and at every live event.

Bischoff has kept quiet while industry "pundits" and other know-it-alls pontificated about what happened during the infamous Monday Night Wars. Basing their accounts on third- and fourth-hand rumors and innuendo, the so-called experts got many more things wrong than right. Now, in Controversy Creates Cash, Bischoff tells what really happened.

Beginning with his days as a salesman for Verne Gagne's American Wrestling Association, Bischoff takes readers behind the scenes of wrestling, writing about the inner workings of the business in a way never before revealed. He demonstrates how controversy helped both WCW and WWE. Eric gives the real numbers behind WCW's red ink -- far lower than reported -- and talks about how Turner Broadcasting's merger with Time Warner, and then Time Warner's merger with AOL, devastated not only WCW but many creative and entrepreneurial businesses within the conglomerate. Bischoff has surprisingly kind words for old rivals like Vince McMahon, but pulls no punches with friends and enemies alike.

Among his revelations: How teaming with Mickey Mouse turned WCW into a national brand. Why Hulk Hogan came to WCW. Why he fired Jesse Ventura for sleeping on the job. Why Steve Austin didn't deserve another contract at WCW, and how Bischoff's canning him was the best thing that ever happened to Austin. How Ted Turner decided WCW should go head-to-head against Raw on Monday nights. How Nitro revolutionized wrestling. Where the New World Order really began. How corporate politics killed WCW. And how he found his inner heel and learned to love being the guy everyone loves to despise.

Bischoff brings a surprisingly personal touch to the story, detailing his rough-and-tumble childhood in Detroit, talking about his family and the things he did to cope with the stress of the high-octane media business. Now a successful entertainment producer as well as a wrestling personality, Bischoff tells how he found contentment after being unceremoniously "sent home" from WCW.

Love him or hate him, readers will never look at a pro wrestling show quite the same way after reading Bischoff's story in Controversy Creates Cash.
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