Japanese-English Romanized Dictionary 9000: How to study Japanese words easily in English anywhere with a smartphone or tablet

Core Voca
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This book is ideal for learners of Japanese as a second language who want to communicate more effectively and also for learners of English who know Japanese.

This book lists 8,743 core Japanese words with English equivalents. Main entries are in Romanized Japanese followed by Kana (Japanese alphabet: Hiragana and Katakana) with Kanji (Chinese characters) or Kana only. Next, in the same line, parts of speech label, and the entry’s English equivalents.

<Sample>

kagaku 化学  [n.] chemistry

kagaku  科学  [n.] science

kagaku sha  化学者  [n.] chemist

kagaku sha  科学者  [n.] scientist

heri kudatte  へりくだって  [ad.] humbly

herikoputā  ヘリコプター  [n.] helicopter

Japanese is written with three different scripts: Hiragana, Katakana, and Kanji (Chinese character). Typical Japanese words are written with Hiragana and Chinese characters. Chinese characters should be used since almost 90% of the language derives from Chinese characters. Katakana is usually used to write foreign words other than Chinese.


* Please refer to the website for more information. www.corevoca.com

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Additional Information

Publisher
Core Voca
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Published on
Mar 9, 2018
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Pages
132
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Business & Economics / Careers / General
Business & Economics / Development / General
Business & Economics / Education
Foreign Language Study / Japanese
Reference / Dictionaries
Reference / Handbooks & Manuals
Reference / Personal & Practical Guides
Reference / Word Lists
Reference / Writing Skills
Study Aids / Tests
Travel / Asia / Japan
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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A syllable is part of a word that contains one vowel sound. In every word of two or more syllables, one syllable is stressed. It’s called ‘stressed syllable’. The vowel sound in that syllable is louder, higher in pitch, and longer than the other vowel sounds in the same word.

In this book, stressed syllable is written in larger boldface. (Example: academy [əkædəmi]) Unstressed syllables are often pronounced with the schwa vowel sound (ə). All one syllable words have primary stress when spoken separately. (Examples: big, day)

The contrast between stressed and unstressed syllables is very important because it helps to create the rhythm of English. The native English speakers rely more on stressed syllable to understand what you say than on the individual sounds of the word.

This book lists 16,616 core English words that are divided into 25 vowel categories containing stressed syllables and listed alphabetically within each category. Also the words are divided into three different levels of ESL (English as a Second Language) so that learners can practice pronunciation according to their levels. Level 1 (for elementary & middle school) is written in red, level 2 (for high school) is written in blue, and level 3 (for university and above) is written in black.

Words with same spelling but different stressed syllables or words with same spelling but different pronunciation are differentiated using following parts of speech.

 

[n.] noun   [a.] adjective   [v.] verb

 

This book is ideal for learners of English as a second language who want to communicate more effectively and also for native English speakers who wish to change dialects.


* Please refer to the website for more information. www.corevoca.com

A syllable is part of a word that contains one vowel sound. In every word of two or more syllables, one syllable is stressed. It’s called ‘stressed syllable’. The vowel sound in that syllable is louder, higher in pitch, and longer than the other vowel sounds in the same word.

In this book, stressed syllable is written in larger boldface. (Example: academy [əkædəmi]) Unstressed syllables are often pronounced with the schwa vowel sound (ə). All one syllable words have primary stress when spoken separately. (Examples: big, day)

The contrast between stressed and unstressed syllables is very important because it helps to create the rhythm of English. The native English speakers rely more on stressed syllable to understand what you say than on the individual sounds of the word.

This book lists 16,616 core English words that are listed alphabetically and are divided into three different levels of ESL (English as a Second Language) so that learners can practice pronunciation according to their levels. Level 1 (for elementary & middle school) is written in red, level 2 (for high school) is written in blue, and level 3 (for university and above) is written in black.  

 

Words with same spelling but different stressed syllables or words with same spelling but different pronunciation are differentiated using following parts of speech.

[n.] noun   [a.] adjective   [v.] verb

 

This book is ideal for learners of English as a second language who want to communicate more effectively and also for native English speakers who wish to change dialects.


* Please refer to the website for more information. www.corevoca.com

The aim of this book is to provide the student of Japanese with a simple method for correlating the writing and the meaning of Japanese characters in such a way as to make them both easy to remember. It is intended not only for the beginner, but also for the more advanced student looking for some relief from the constant frustration of how to write the kanji and some way to systematize what he or she already knows. The author begins with writing because--contrary to first impressions--it is in fact the simpler of the two. He abandons the traditional method of ordering the kanji according to their frequency of use and organizes them according to their component parts or "primitive elements." Assigning each of these parts a distinct meaning with its own distinct image, the student is led to harness the powers of "imaginative memory" to learn the various combinations that result. In addition, each kanji is given its own key word to represent the meaning, or one of the principal meanings, of that character. These key words provide the setting for a particular kanji's "story," whose protagonists are the primitive elements. In this way, students are able to complete in a few short months a task that would otherwise take years. Armed with the same skills as Chinese or Korean students, who know the meaning and writing of the kanji but not their pronunciation in Japanese, they are now in a much better position to learn to read (which is treated in a separate volume). For further information and a sample of the contents, visit http: ///www.nanzan-u.ac.jp/SHUBUNKEN/publications/miscPublications/Remembering_the_Kanji_l.htm.
This book lists approximately 9,000 core Japanese words that can be searched with English equivalents. It’s ideal for learners of Japanese as a second language who want to communicate more effectively and also for learners of English who know Japanese.

Japanese is written with three different scripts: Hiragana, Katakana, and Kanji.  Typical Japanese words are written with Hiragana and Kanji. Katakana is usually used to write foreign words other than Chinese.

English main entries are in alphabetical order and stressed syllables of them are inboldface type  for clear communication in English.

(The contrast between stressed and unstressed syllables is very important because it helps to create the rhythm of English.) 


Each main entry is followed by parts of speech label and the entry’s Japanese equivalents. All Japanese equivalent for main entries are written in both Rōmaji (Roman letters) and Japanese writing: Kana and Kanji (Chinese characters) if applicable.


[example]

abbreviate  [v.] shōryaku suru 省略する, tanshuku suru 短縮する

Learners can select to learn Chinese characters according to their needs and levels. For those who know Chinese characters, it might be easier to learn Japanese since almost 90% of the language derives from Chinese characters.

Since many Japanese prefer to use foreign words in daily conversation, Japanese pronunciation of foreign words are romanized in this book for better communication with Japanese.

[example]

advice  [n.] adobaisu アドバイス, chūkoku 忠告, jogen 助言


* Please refer to the website for more information. www.corevoca.com

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