Korean-Mandarin Core Dictionary for Chinese: How to study easily Korean words for school, tests, business and travel in Mandarin anywhere with a smartphone or tablet

Core Voca
Free sample

[Highlights]

Study Korean anytime and anywhere with smartphone, tablet, etc

Focused on the pronunciation of common Chinese characters, which comprise approximately 70% of Chinese characters in Korea and China

Main entries are in Hangul (Korean alphabet) alphabetically for easy vocabulary search with Romanized Korean pronunciation


[Who needs this book]

Students, businessmen, travelers who want to increase Korean vocabulary in short term

Mandarin speakers who want to increase Korean vocabulary themselves easily

Anyone who want to give this book as a gift to their children, grandchildren or others

This book lists approximately 4,800 core Korean vocabulary for school, examinations, business, and travel. Main entries are in Hangul (Korean alphabet) alphabetically with Chinese characters (traditional font).  Chinese characters (both simplified and traditional fonts if applicable) and Pinyin (Romanized standard Chinese pronunciation) follow in the same line.

Common Chinese character words are written in blue, while certain words with same meaning but with different syllable order are written in red.  Some syllables with partially different fonts are also written in red.

In case of part of speech, most of Korean verbs are in the form of ‘noun+‘하다(hada)’ with some exceptions.

[Sample]

사고(事故)  / 事故  shì gù

사고(思考)  / 思考  sī kăo

사고방식(思考方式)  / 思维方式 (思維方式)  sī wéi fāng shì

사과(謝過)  / 请罪 (請罪)  qǐng zuì

사과(謝過)하다  / 请罪 (請罪)  qǐng zuì

사기(詐欺)  / 欺诈 (欺詐)  qī zhà


* Please refer to the website for more information. www.corevoca.com

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Additional Information

Publisher
Core Voca
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Published on
Mar 29, 2018
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Pages
116
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Business & Economics / Careers / Job Hunting
Business & Economics / Development / General
Business & Economics / Education
Foreign Language Study / Korean
History / Asia / Korea
Reference / Dictionaries
Reference / Handbooks & Manuals
Reference / Personal & Practical Guides
Reference / Word Lists
Study Aids / Tests
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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A syllable is part of a word that contains one vowel sound. In every word of two or more syllables, one syllable is stressed. It’s called ‘stressed syllable’. The vowel sound in that syllable is louder, higher in pitch, and longer than the other vowel sounds in the same word.

In this book, stressed syllable is written in larger boldface. (Example: academy [əkædəmi]) Unstressed syllables are often pronounced with the schwa vowel sound (ə). All one syllable words have primary stress when spoken separately. (Examples: big, day)

The contrast between stressed and unstressed syllables is very important because it helps to create the rhythm of English. The native English speakers rely more on stressed syllable to understand what you say than on the individual sounds of the word.

This book lists 16,616 core English words that are divided into 25 vowel categories containing stressed syllables and listed alphabetically within each category. Also the words are divided into three different levels of ESL (English as a Second Language) so that learners can practice pronunciation according to their levels. Level 1 (for elementary & middle school) is written in red, level 2 (for high school) is written in blue, and level 3 (for university and above) is written in black.

Words with same spelling but different stressed syllables or words with same spelling but different pronunciation are differentiated using following parts of speech.

 

[n.] noun   [a.] adjective   [v.] verb

 

This book is ideal for learners of English as a second language who want to communicate more effectively and also for native English speakers who wish to change dialects.


* Please refer to the website for more information. www.corevoca.com

A syllable is part of a word that contains one vowel sound. In every word of two or more syllables, one syllable is stressed. It’s called ‘stressed syllable’. The vowel sound in that syllable is louder, higher in pitch, and longer than the other vowel sounds in the same word.

In this book, stressed syllable is written in larger boldface. (Example: academy [əkædəmi]) Unstressed syllables are often pronounced with the schwa vowel sound (ə). All one syllable words have primary stress when spoken separately. (Examples: big, day)

The contrast between stressed and unstressed syllables is very important because it helps to create the rhythm of English. The native English speakers rely more on stressed syllable to understand what you say than on the individual sounds of the word.

This book lists 16,616 core English words that are listed alphabetically and are divided into three different levels of ESL (English as a Second Language) so that learners can practice pronunciation according to their levels. Level 1 (for elementary & middle school) is written in red, level 2 (for high school) is written in blue, and level 3 (for university and above) is written in black.  

 

Words with same spelling but different stressed syllables or words with same spelling but different pronunciation are differentiated using following parts of speech.

[n.] noun   [a.] adjective   [v.] verb

 

This book is ideal for learners of English as a second language who want to communicate more effectively and also for native English speakers who wish to change dialects.


* Please refer to the website for more information. www.corevoca.com

With a New Foreword

The heartwrenching New York Times bestseller about the only known person born inside a North Korean prison camp to have escaped. 

North Korea’s political prison camps have existed twice as long as Stalin’s Soviet gulags and twelve times as long as the Nazi concentration camps. No one born and raised in these camps is known to have escaped. No one, that is, except Shin Dong-hyuk.

In Escape From Camp 14, Blaine Harden unlocks the secrets of the world’s most repressive totalitarian state through the story of Shin’s shocking imprisonment and his astounding getaway. Shin knew nothing of civilized existence—he saw his mother as a competitor for food, guards raised him to be a snitch, and he witnessed the execution of his mother and brother.

The late “Dear Leader” Kim Jong Il was recognized throughout the world, but his country remains sealed as his third son and chosen heir, Kim Jong Eun, consolidates power. Few foreigners are allowed in, and few North Koreans are able to leave. North Korea is hungry, bankrupt, and armed with nuclear weapons. It is also a human rights catastrophe. Between 150,000 and 200,000 people work as slaves in its political prison camps. These camps are clearly visible in satellite photographs, yet North Korea’s government denies they exist.

Harden’s harrowing narrative exposes this hidden dystopia, focusing on an extraordinary young man who came of age inside the highest security prison in the highest security state. Escape from Camp 14 offers an unequalled inside account of one of the world’s darkest nations. It is a tale of endurance and courage, survival and hope.

This book lists approximately 9,000 core Japanese words that can be searched with English equivalents. It’s ideal for learners of Japanese as a second language who want to communicate more effectively and also for learners of English who know Japanese.

Japanese is written with three different scripts: Hiragana, Katakana, and Kanji.  Typical Japanese words are written with Hiragana and Kanji. Katakana is usually used to write foreign words other than Chinese.

English main entries are in alphabetical order and stressed syllables of them are inboldface type  for clear communication in English.

(The contrast between stressed and unstressed syllables is very important because it helps to create the rhythm of English.) 


Each main entry is followed by parts of speech label and the entry’s Japanese equivalents. All Japanese equivalent for main entries are written in both Rōmaji (Roman letters) and Japanese writing: Kana and Kanji (Chinese characters) if applicable.


[example]

abbreviate  [v.] shōryaku suru 省略する, tanshuku suru 短縮する

Learners can select to learn Chinese characters according to their needs and levels. For those who know Chinese characters, it might be easier to learn Japanese since almost 90% of the language derives from Chinese characters.

Since many Japanese prefer to use foreign words in daily conversation, Japanese pronunciation of foreign words are romanized in this book for better communication with Japanese.

[example]

advice  [n.] adobaisu アドバイス, chūkoku 忠告, jogen 助言


* Please refer to the website for more information. www.corevoca.com

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