A Very Large Expanse of Sea

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Longlisted for the National Book Award for Young People's Literature!

From the New York Times and USA Today bestselling author of the Shatter Me series comes a powerful, heartrending contemporary novel about fear, first love, and the devastating impact of prejudice.

It’s 2002, a year after 9/11. It’s an extremely turbulent time politically, but especially so for someone like Shirin, a sixteen-year-old Muslim girl who’s tired of being stereotyped.

Shirin is never surprised by how horrible people can be. She’s tired of the rude stares, the degrading comments—even the physical violence—she endures as a result of her race, her religion, and the hijab she wears every day. So she’s built up protective walls and refuses to let anyone close enough to hurt her. Instead, she drowns her frustrations in music and spends her afternoons break-dancing with her brother.

But then she meets Ocean James. He’s the first person in forever who really seems to want to get to know Shirin. It terrifies her—they seem to come from two irreconcilable worlds—and Shirin has had her guard up for so long that she’s not sure she’ll ever be able to let it down.

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About the author

Tahereh Mafi is the New York Times and USA Today bestselling author of A Very Large Expanse of Sea, the Shatter Me series, Furthermore, and Whichwood. She can usually be found overcaffeinated and stuck in a book. You can find her online just about anywhere @TaherehMafi or on her website, www.taherehbooks.com.

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4.6
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Additional Information

Publisher
HarperCollins
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Published on
Oct 16, 2018
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Pages
336
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ISBN
9780062866585
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Features
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Language
English
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Genres
Young Adult Fiction / Diversity & Multicultural
Young Adult Fiction / Religious / Muslim
Young Adult Fiction / Romance / Contemporary
Young Adult Fiction / Social Themes / Prejudice & Racism
Young Adult Fiction / Social Themes / Values & Virtues
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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