Life Along the South Manchurian Railway: The Memoirs of Itō Takeo

M.E. Sharpe
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Cover -- Half Title -- Title -- Copyright -- Contents -- Introduction: ltō Takeo and the Research Work of the South Manchurian Railway Company -- 1. The Origins of the South Manchurian Railway Company -- The South Manchurian Railway and the Management of Manchuria -- The Earliest Array of Research and Study Agencies -- 2. I Enter the Company -- My First Encounter with China -- The Shinjinkai and My Position -- The Research Organs at the Time I Joined the SMR -- 3. My Years in Peking-Japan in China -- Peking Friends and Acquaintances -- In the History of China's Struggle for Liberation (1)
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Additional Information

Publisher
M.E. Sharpe
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Published on
Dec 31, 1988
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Pages
241
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ISBN
9780873324656
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Asia / China
History / General
Transportation / Railroads / General
Transportation / Railroads / History
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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In this account of an unprecedented feat of engineering, vision, and courage, Stephen E. Ambrose offers a historical successor to his universally acclaimed Undaunted Courage, which recounted the explorations of the West by Lewis and Clark.
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The Union had won the Civil War and slavery had been abolished, but Abraham Lincoln, who was an early and constant champion of railroads, would not live to see the great achievement. In Ambrose's hands, this enterprise, with its huge expenditure of brainpower, muscle, and sweat, comes to life.
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The never-before-told story of one of the worst rail disasters in U.S. history in which two trains full of people, trapped high in the Cascade Mountains, are hit by a devastating avalanche

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