Scorched Earth: Peacekeeping in Timor during a campaign of death and destruction

Big Sky Publishing
1
Free sample

A dramatic story of the forgotten heroes who faced down the military might of a neighbouring giant.

Peter Watt, Bestselling Australian Author

An exceptional book that fills the gap in our 24 years of horrific terror.

Bi-Hali Gusmao, Vice-President of Veterans Institution, Dili, East Timor

As an UN peacekeeper, I joined the East Timorese fight for life. By then, the earth had drunk the blood of one third of their population. But worse was still to come.

I would see it for myself.

I saw bodies carried to their deaths, machetes carve flesh from bone, and bullets spray into crowds of Timorese and at us peacekeepers. I learned the true meaning of fear, hopelessness, and courage. Shades of truth were twisted for evil gain. Every day I prepared to die. Decisions I made, which seemed so right, jeopardized the lives of others.

Police held automatic weapons to my head, militia wrote my name on death lists, and people drew their last breath, all of them brave, braver than me.

For this is the true story of my experience. In the midst of the East Timorese fight for independence, militia were determined to enact their scorched earth policy and raze Timor to the ground.

Timorese voted, Timor burned. It is their story, our story: a story that must be told.

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About the author

Tammy Pemper is an Australian writer who has worked with the United Nations, Australian Federal Police, and the US Peace Corps to name a few. She is married to Peter, the Australian peacekeeper who is the central figure in this book, and came under fire in Timor. In addition to her passion for writing, Tammy continues to support projects worldwide, and will donate the profits of this book back into the Timorese community.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Big Sky Publishing
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Published on
Aug 1, 2019
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Pages
320
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ISBN
9781922265548
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Editors, Journalists, Publishers
Biography & Autobiography / Military
History / General
History / Military / General
History / Military / Wars & Conflicts (Other)
Political Science / Peace
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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A harrowing exploration of the collapse of American diplomacy and the abdication of global leadership, by the winner of the 2018 Pulitzer Prize in Public Service.

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