Two Languages at Work

Contributions to the Sociology of Language [CSL]

Book 74
Walter de Gruyter
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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE SOCIOLOGY OF LANGUAGE brings to students, researchers and practitioners in all of the social and language-related sciences carefully selected book-length publications dealing with sociolinguistic theory, methods, findings and applications.

It approaches the study of language in society in its broadest sense, as a truly international and interdisciplinary field in which various approaches, theoretical and empirical, supplement and complement each other.

The series invites the attention of linguists, language teachers of all interests, sociologists, political scientists, anthropologists, historians etc. to the development of the sociology of language.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Walter de Gruyter
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Published on
Aug 25, 2011
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Pages
291
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ISBN
9783110815221
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Language Arts & Disciplines / Linguistics / General
Language Arts & Disciplines / Linguistics / Historical & Comparative
Language Arts & Disciplines / Linguistics / Psycholinguistics
Language Arts & Disciplines / Linguistics / Sociolinguistics
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Content Protection
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A wealth of evidence demonstrates that disabled domestic students experience disabling barriers in such areas as funding, pedagogy and social life in Higher Education (HE). Research also indicates that non-disabled international students experience a wide range of cultural and linguistic difficulties throughout their university experience whilst studying in England. Nevertheless, there is a dearth of research concerning the specific experiences of disabled international students in English universities. With the increasing internationalisation of HE in the past two decades this is highly significant. Analysing disabled international students’ accounts in British universities appears to be all the more pertinent due to the current austerity measures, which have impacted on the financial situation of Higher Education Institutions. Armineh Soorenian comments on the relevance of inclusive educational theories and policies within an increasingly internationalised HE system, with reference to disabled international students’ experiences in England. The project is both timely and appropriate as there is an acute shortage of documentation on the application of policies for the inclusion of disabled students and disabled international students specifically in English universities. The findings identify key barriers in the four broad categories of (1) Information, Access and Funding; (2) Disability Services; (3) Learning and Teaching; and (4) Non-Disability Support Services such as accommodation and social life. The study provides an up-to-date snapshot of disabled international students’ accounts and the multiple disadvantages they experience in their universities based on their identities as ‘disabled’, ‘international’ and sometimes ‘mature’ students. The author also draws on a number of insights which could contribute towards a more inclusive HE system. The implication of concentrating on disabled international students’ experiences have direct ramifications, not only for this specific group, but also a wide range of students from diverse minority backgrounds who could gain from inclusive practices in education.
A wealth of evidence demonstrates that disabled domestic students experience disabling barriers in such areas as funding, pedagogy and social life in Higher Education (HE). Research also indicates that non-disabled international students experience a wide range of cultural and linguistic difficulties throughout their university experience whilst studying in England. Nevertheless, there is a dearth of research concerning the specific experiences of disabled international students in English universities. With the increasing internationalisation of HE in the past two decades this is highly significant. Analysing disabled international students’ accounts in British universities appears to be all the more pertinent due to the current austerity measures, which have impacted on the financial situation of Higher Education Institutions. Armineh Soorenian comments on the relevance of inclusive educational theories and policies within an increasingly internationalised HE system, with reference to disabled international students’ experiences in England. The project is both timely and appropriate as there is an acute shortage of documentation on the application of policies for the inclusion of disabled students and disabled international students specifically in English universities. The findings identify key barriers in the four broad categories of (1) Information, Access and Funding; (2) Disability Services; (3) Learning and Teaching; and (4) Non-Disability Support Services such as accommodation and social life. The study provides an up-to-date snapshot of disabled international students’ accounts and the multiple disadvantages they experience in their universities based on their identities as ‘disabled’, ‘international’ and sometimes ‘mature’ students. The author also draws on a number of insights which could contribute towards a more inclusive HE system. The implication of concentrating on disabled international students’ experiences have direct ramifications, not only for this specific group, but also a wide range of students from diverse minority backgrounds who could gain from inclusive practices in education.
Teaching and Learning in a Multilingual School: Choices, Risks, and Dilemmas is for teachers and teacher educators working in communities that educate children who do not speak English as a first language. At the center of the book are findings from a four-year critical ethnographic case study of a Canadian high school with a large number of emigrant students from Hong Kong and rich descriptions of the multitude of ways teachers and students thought about, responded to, and negotiated the issues and dilemmas that arose. The solutions and insights they derived from their experiences of working across linguistic, cultural, and racial differences will be extremely valuable to educators in other locales that have become home to large numbers of immigrant families. The book is designed to help readers think about how the issues and dilemmas in the case study manifest themselves in their own communities and how to apply the insights they gain to their own teaching and learning contexts:

* Each chapter includes four components: an excerpt from the ethnographic study; an analytic commentary on the ethnographic text drawn from a variety of theoretical perspectives and academic disciplines (including interactionist sociolinguistics, language minority education, English as a Second Language education, critical literacy, anti-racist education, and critical teacher education); a pedagogical discussion; and suggestions for further reflection and discussion.

* The book features the use of ethnographic play writing to engage readers with the issues that arise in multicultural/multilingual schools. The author's play Hong Kong, Canada is included in its entirety and is used to stimulate further discussion of the issues raised in each of the chapters.

* Although it is organized around two different kinds of schooling dilemmas--dilemmas of speech and silence, and dilemmas of discrimination--everyday dilemmas of curriculum and assessment are also discussed throughout the book.

* A methodological discussion of the choices the author made while designing, conducting, and writing up the critical ethnographic case study makes the book useful in qualitative research methodology courses.

* A set of strategies and activities is provided for helping students develop English oral presentation skills.
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