Demography of Russia: From the Past to the Present

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This book examines the demographic development of Russia from the late Russian Empire to the contemporary Russian Federation, and includes discussions of marriage patterns, fertility, mortality, and inter-regional migration. In this pioneering study, the authors present the first English-language overview of demographic data collection in Russia. Chapters in the book offer a systematic overview of the legislation regulating fertility and the family sphere, a study of the factors determining first and higher order births, and an examination of population distribution across Russian regions. The book also combines research tools from the social sciences with a medical approach to provide a study of mortality rates. By bringing together approaches from several disciplines – demography, economics, and sociology – the authors of this book provide a comprehensive and detailed assessment of the historical roots of Russia's demographic development.
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About the author

Tatiana Karabchuk is Assistant Professor of Sociology at United Arab Emirates University, UAE.Kazuhiro Kumo is a professor at the Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University, Tokyo, Japan.Ekaterina Selezneva is a researcher at the Institute for East and Southeast European Studies, Regensburg, Germany.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Springer
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Published on
Nov 24, 2016
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Pages
334
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ISBN
9781137518507
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Language
English
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Genres
Business & Economics / Economics / General
Business & Economics / General
Political Science / General
Political Science / World / Russian & Former Soviet Union
Social Science / Demography
Social Science / Sociology / Marriage & Family
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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David E. Hoffman
From the author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning history The Dead Hand comes the riveting story of a spy who cracked open the Soviet military research establishment and a penetrating portrait of the CIA’s Moscow station, an outpost of daring espionage in the last years of the Cold War
 
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Svetlana Alexievich
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NAMED ONE OF THE TEN BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY THE WASHINGTON POST AND PUBLISHERS WEEKLY • LOS ANGELES TIMES BOOK PRIZE WINNER

NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY
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Praise for Svetlana Alexievich and Secondhand Time

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