The Green Fairy Book: eBook Edition

Jazzybee Verlag
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Perhaps the best and handsomest of these tales of wonder is " The Green Fairy Book," edited by Andrew Lang. This is the third of Andrew Lang's stories of fairies, the blue book and the red book having preceded it. It is a volume of folklore. His stories are adapted from the tales of France, Germany, Russia, Italy, Scotland, England, and even China. It is enough to say that when such clever women as Madame d'Aulnoy and Mrs. Lang contribute to the book it must be really good. Contents: To The Friendly Reader The Blue Bird The Half-Chick Rosanella Sylvain And Jocosa Fairy Gifts The Three Little Pigs Heart Of Ice The Enchanted Ring The Snuff-Box The Magic Swan The Dirty Shepherdess The Enchanted Snake The Biter Bit King Kojata The Story Of Hok Lee And The Dwarfs Prince Vivien And The Princess Placida Jorinde And Joringel Allerleirauh; Or, The Many-Furred Creature The Twelve Huntsmen Spindle, Shuttle, And Needle The Crystal Coffin The Three Snake-Leaves Jack My Hedgehog The Story Of A Clever Tailor The Golden Mermaid The Three Dogs
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Additional Information

Publisher
Jazzybee Verlag
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Published on
Dec 31, 2012
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Pages
364
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ISBN
9783849609320
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Language
English
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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Fairy tales and stories of the 'Arabian Nights' order are not often attempted by modern imaginations, but collections of the old legends are perennially popular. Mr. Andrew Lang has not yet exhausted the supply of these last, although he has to go to countries more and more remote for every new year's gleanings. For the material in his latest volume, ' The Brown Fairy Book ', he has searched the folk lore of the red Indians, the black Australians, the African Kaffirs, and the natives of Brazil and New Caledonia. Besides these, there are some tales of moment from the French and Persian, some of them being specially translated for this work. The beautiful illustrations in color are the work of Mr. Henry Ford. This book is illustrated and annotated with a rare extensive biographical sketch of the author, Andrew Lang, written by Sir Edmund Gosse, CB, a contemporary poet and writer. Contents: What The Rose Did To The Cypress Ball-Carrier And The Bad One How Ball-Carrier Finished His Task The Bunyip Father Grumbler The Story Of The Yara The Cunning Hare The Turtle And His Bride How Geirald The Coward Was Punished Hábogi How The Little Brother Set Free His Big Brothers The Sacred Milk Of Koumongoé The Wicked Wolverine The Husband Of The Rat's Daughter The Mermaid And The Boy Pivi And Kabo The Elf Maiden How Some Wild Animals Became Tame Ones Fortune And The Wood-Cutter The Enchanted Head The Sister Of The Sun The Prince And The Three Fates The Fox And The Lapp Kisa The Cat The Lion And The Cat Which Was The Foolishest? Asmund And Signy Rübezahl Story Of The King Who Would Be Stronger Than Fate Story Of Wali Dâd The Simple-Hearted Tale Of A Tortoise And Of A Mischievous Monkey The Knights Of The Fish
First and foremost, always and forever, among tales for children come the fairy tales. What were childhood without the fairy tale? That child who has never wandered through the magic gardens of Fairyland is unfortunate indeed. But that child does not exist, for the mind and heart of every child, even all unaided, will make for itself a fairyland out of anything and nothing. But the art of writing fairy tales seems to be another thing that has vanished with the vanished childhood of the race. The best fairy tales are always the old ones, stories that were never really written, but just grew in the telling as they passed down through generations of fireside evenings. They were told or enjoyed by grown men and women in an earlier, more naive age, and they never lose their appeal to the child in us as to the children around us now. As to new fairy stories, well, Mr. Andrew Lang, the untiring editor, who makes it possible to unearth new-old stories every year and dress them out in a new colour of raiment for the Christmas tree, says some very unkind things of them in his latest offering, The Lilac Fairy Book . "The three hundred and sixty-five authors who try to write new fairy tales are very tiresome," he says. "Their fairies try to be funny and fail, or they try to preach and succeed. Real fairies never preach or talk slang-nobody can write a new fairy tale; the thing is impossible." The tenor of Mr. Lang's reproach of modern writers of fairy tales is that they attempt to write just for children and therefore fail. Possibly he may be right! But we will forgive him his feeling against the writers who prefer to write rather than to edit, for the sake of the fine new-old stories he has found for us here. It is really astonishing how Mr. Lang goes on unearthing so many new stories-new-old is what we mean- every year. Some of the stories in this new book have come from Ireland, some from the Highlands of Scotland, some from wild Wales.
The Fairy Book Series is further enriched by the addition of this latest volume, which is quite as gorgeous as the preceding ones-though the author might well be supposed to have exhausted his supply of colors and fairy tales. Mr. Lang, after traveling the world over to collect stories, asks why the stories of the remotest people resemble each other. Fortunately, he answers the question himself. "Of course, in the immeasurable past, they have been carried about by conquering races, and learned by conquering races from vanquished peoples. Slaves carried far from home brought their stories with them into captivity. Wanderers, travelers, shipwrecked men, merchants, and wives stolen from alien tribes have diffused the stories; gipsies and Jews have peddled them about, Roman soldiers of many different races, moved here and there about the Empire, have trafficked in them. From the remotest days men have been wanderers, and wherever they went their stories accompanied them." '"The Story of the Hero Makowa" begins in the good old way, "once upon a time" and the temptation to follow the hero Is irresistible even though he seeks a deep black pool where the crocodiles lived. He makes giants shrink, and claps them into a bag which he carries easily because he Increases in size and strength with every encouuter with an enemy. Perhaps the author intends to point a moral and he certainly adorns the tale with incredible deeds of adventure. "Ian, The Soldier's Son" has a wonderful career in his search for the daughters of Grianaig. Magic transformation takes place on every page. Thus, a brown-haired youth is changed into a raven, and back again to his own self; and a beautiful maiden whom the wicked enchanter had turned Into a horse is released from the spell through the courage of the soldier's son.
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