e-Commerce: An e-Book Special Report

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Several times a year, The Wall Street Journal publishes Special Reports about e-commerce and technology. With this segment of the economy generating billions of dollars in revenue and market capitalization, it's no wonder that this is one of the most popular features of both the print and interactive versions of the Journal.
Here, in E-Commerce, is the best of these Special Reports. Here are articles that profile the challenges facing "old-economy" businesses like car manufacturers as they go online, and uncover the Internet's dirty little secret: porn, the most profitable industry on the Web. Here are explorations of the many new business models for working on the Web, from "eating your own dog food" to show customers how well your technology works, to ensuring that customer service reigns supreme even in the New Economy -- and articles that highlight how even in a digital world, things like pricing structures and the difficulties of starting a business remain constant. Here are interviews with e-commerce pioneers, like the founders of Yahoo!, as well as articles that tell the tales of those who have taken the e-commerce plunge, like Merrill Lynch CEO David H. Komansky and Curran Catalog founder Jeff Curran. And a series of stories shows "How Technology Has Changed the Way We..." do just about everything, from staying in touch to doing homework to having babies.
Collected and presented here for the first time in e-book format, E-Commerce is a searchable, portable, and valuable resource from the award-winning staff of The Wall Street Journal.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Simon and Schuster
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Published on
Jan 17, 2001
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Pages
497
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ISBN
9780743215169
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Features
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Language
English
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Genres
Business & Economics / Commerce
Computers / Computer Science
Computers / Electronic Commerce
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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The Staff of the Wall Street Journal
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Here, in Breakaway: Small Business, is the very best of the best Special Reports. Here is the best of the popular column Here's the Problem..., the business case-study version of Can This Marriage Be Saved, in which a problem affecting a particular small business is analyzed and recommendations are offered by two or more experts. Here is the best of the in-depth profiles of America's fastest-growing small businesses, such as Gazoontite.com, which grew from 4 employees, one store, and 800 square feet of storage to 120 employees, four stores, an 8,000 square-foot warehouse, and $1.2 million in sales in less than a year. Here, as well, are articles that educate small business owners about how to avoid a family feud in a family business; how to identify the six categories of investors; how to create the right IRAs for yourself and your employees; how to set up a home office that won't take over your home; how to defend your patents; and many other crucial tips.
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The Staff of the Wall Street Journal
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Here, in Focus on Retirement, is the best of these Special Reports. As you might expect from the nation's preeminent business publication, here are tips on how you can stretch your retirement income, when you should pay your estate taxes, and how many players you really need on your financial team. Here are the best stories from the popular If You're Thinking of Retiring In... feature, medical news on combating heart disease and other illnesses, and ideas on what to do with all that free time. In Focus on Retirement you will
Meet Barbara Barrie, a 68-year-old actress who has turned her battle against colorectal cancer into a crusade for public awareness;
Ride the rails with Ira Lomench, who organized an 18-day transcontinental charter train trip for a few friends;
Investigate Sun City Huntley, an active-adult community 45 miles from Chicago that boasts a golf course and a 94,000-square-foot lodge with health club and lounges; and
Join the annual national reunion of the Knickerbocker clan in Schaghticoke, New York, advertised on the family website.

Collected and presented here for the first time in e-book format, Focus on Retirement is a searchable, portable, and hugely valuable resource from the award-winning staff of The Wall Street Journal.
The Staff of the Wall Street Journal
Harris Interactive
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