The Cherokee Removal: A Brief History with Documents, Edition 3

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The Cherokee Removal of 1838–1839 unfolded against a complex backdrop of competing ideologies, self-interest, party politics, altruism, and ambition. Using documents that convey Cherokee voices, government policy, and white citizens’ views, Theda Perdue continues to present a multifaceted account of this complicated moment in American history. The third edition features new documents, including two contemporary newspaper articles and an interview with a former Cherokee slave. In addition, a new section allows readers to reflect on the legacy of the Trail of Tears and those affected by it. The introduction provides students with succinct historical background. Document headnotes contextualize the selections and draw attention to historical methodology. To aid students’ investigation of this compelling topic, the map and the chronology of the Cherokee Removal have been augmented by new questions for consideration and a selected bibliography.
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About the author

Theda Perdue is professor of history and American studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Her publications include Slavery and the Evolution of Cherokee Society, 1540 1865 (1979); Nations Remembered: An Oral History of the Five Civilized Tribes (1980); Cherokee Editor (1983); Native Carolinians (1985); The Cherokees (1988); Cherokee Women: Gender and Culture Change, 1700 1835 (1998); Sifters: Native American Women's Lives (2001); The Columbia Guide to American Indians of the Southeast (2001); and "Mixed Blood" Indians: Racial Construction in the Early South (2003). Michael D. Green is professor of history and American studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His publications include The Creeks: A Critical Bibliography (1979); The Politics of Indian Removal: Creek Government and Society in Crisis (1985); The Creeks: A Tribal History (1990); and The Columbia Guide to American Indians of the Southeast (2001).
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Additional Information

Publisher
Macmillan Higher Education
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Published on
Apr 29, 2016
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Pages
224
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ISBN
9781319049706
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Language
English
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Genres
History / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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On the southern frontier in the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, European men--including traders, soldiers, and government agents--sometimes married Native women. Children of these unions were known by whites as "half-breeds." The Indian societies into which they were born, however, had no corresponding concepts of race or "blood." Moreover, counter to European customs and laws, Native lineage was traced through the mother only. No familial status or rights stemmed from the father.

"Mixed Blood" Indians looks at a fascinating array of such birth- and kin-related issues as they were alternately misunderstood and astutely exploited by both Native and European cultures. Theda Perdue discusses the assimilation of non-Indians into Native societies, their descendants' participation in tribal life, and the white cultural assumptions conveyed in the designation "mixed blood." In addition to unions between European men and Native women, Perdue also considers the special cases arising from the presence of white women and African men and women in Indian society.

From the colonial through the early national era, "mixed bloods" were often in the middle of struggles between white expansionism and Native cultural survival. That these "half-breeds" often resisted appeals to their "civilized" blood helped foster an enduring image of Natives as fickle allies of white politicians, missionaries, and entrepreneurs. "Mixed Blood" Indians rereads a number of early writings to show us the Native outlook on these misperceptions and to make clear that race is too simple a measure of their--or any peoples'--motives.

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