The Strenuous Life: Essays and Addresses

Courier Corporation
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Politician, soldier, naturalist, and historian — a century after the peak of his multifaceted career, Theodore Roosevelt remains a towering symbol of American optimism and progress. This collection of speeches and commentaries from 1899 through 1901 embodies the Rough Rider's enduring ideals for attaining a robust political, social, and personal life.
The 26th president of the United States, Theodore Roosevelt (1858–1919) served as Chief Executive from 1901 to 1909 and was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1906 for his mediation of the Russo-Japanese War. Roosevelt wrote 35 books and delivered numerous lectures on topics ranging from citizenship and success to duty and sportsmanship. His 1899 address to a Chicago audience, "The Strenuous Life," articulates his belief in the transformative powers that individuals can achieve by overcoming hardship. Along with the other speeches and essays in this collection, Roosevelt's work offers an inspiring vision of moral rectitude and stalwart leadership.
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About the author

Periodically throughout his extraordinary career, Theodore Roosevelt turned to the writing of history. Energetic about everything he did, he imbued his writing with verve and a strong sense of drama that continues to attract readers today. Born in New York City and educated at Harvard University, he immersed himself in public affairs long before he became President of the United States. A man of many talents, he was, among other things, police commissioner, mayoral candidate, rancher, hunter, explorer, soldier, and governor. His strong sense of history probably influenced his actions more times than not, and certainly he brought to the White House in 1901 an awareness of how much the past conditions the present and informs the future. Roosevelt made history, influenced history, and wrote history.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Courier Corporation
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Published on
Mar 2, 2012
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Pages
160
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ISBN
9780486112381
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Language
English
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Genres
Literary Collections / Speeches
Philosophy / Essays
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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In the relatively short span of 25 years — from his first national campaign in 1920 to his death in the first year of his fourth term as President in 1945 — Franklin Delano Roosevelt delivered hundreds of speeches, many of them masterly orations.
Perhaps the finest speechmaker in American history, FDR was a consummate expert at reading his audience. He could be dazzlingly informal, imperiously statesmanlike, witheringly sarcastic, stern, and serious, and when the occasion permitted, outright funny. Though his audiences often included more than 30 million listeners in America and millions more around the world, he succeeded in doing what so many speakers strive for and so few accomplish — he left his listeners with the feeling that he was speaking to them alone.
This representative collection of 27 of FDR's finest speeches recalls a number of momentous events in his political career and the life of the nation. Included are his dramatic and inspirational First Inaugural Address (March 4, 1933) in which he told the nation that "the only thing we have to fear is fear itself"; his first "Fireside Chat" (March 12, 1933) over the radio; his dramatic War Message to Congress (December 8, 1941) following the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor ("a day that will live in infamy"); his Fourth Inaugural Address (January 20, 1945); and many more.
Assembled here in one convenient volume, these speeches provide students of history, politics, and rhetoric, as well as general readers, with an immensely useful reference, a wealth of fine oration, and a valuable window on the Roosevelt years.
A selection of speeches by the most inspiring and persuasive orators in American history

Penguin presents a series of six portable, accessible, and—above all—essential reads from American political history, selected by leading scholars. Series editor Richard Beeman, author of The Penguin Guide to the U.S. Constitution, draws together the great texts of American civic life to create a timely and informative mini-library of perennially vital issues. Whether readers are encountering these classic writings for the first time, or brushing up in anticipation of the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act, these slim volumes will serve as a powerful and illuminating resource for scholars, students, and civic-minded citizens.

American Political Speeches includes the best American rhetoric from inside and outside the White House. Some of the greatest words spoken in American history have come from men and women who lacked the biggest bully pulpit in the country, but who nevertheless were able to move the nation with words. Frederick Douglass explained the irony of Independence Day from the perspective of a slave. Martin Luther King, Jr. described his dream of an interracial America. William Jennings Bryan gave voice to social discontent with a single phrase, "a cross of gold." Barbara Jordan summoned the nation"s outrage during the impeachment hearings against Richard Nixon. And the best presidents, not by coincidence, have tended to be those with an appreciation for the use of language: Lincoln explaining a new birth of freedom at Gettysburg; John Kennedy voicing moral outrage at the Berlin Wall; Franklin D. Roosevelt chatting to a nation gathered in front of radios; Ronald Reagan addressing Congress freshly healed from an assassination attempt.
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