Quantum Information Processing: Edition 2

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Quantum processing and communication is emerging as a challenging technique at the beginning of the new millennium. This is an up-to-date insight into the current research of quantum superposition, entanglement, and the quantum measurement process - the key ingredients of quantum information processing. The authors further address quantum protocols and algorithms. Complementary to similar programmes in other countries and at the European level, the German Research Foundation (DFG) realized a focused research program on quantum information. The contributions - written by leading experts - bring together the latest results in quantum information as well as addressing all the relevant questions.
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About the author

Thomas Beth studied mathematics, physics and medicine. He received his Ph.D. in 1978 and his Postdoctoral Lecturer Qualification (Dr.-Ing. habil.) in informatics in 1984. From a position as Professor of computer science at the University of London he was apppointed to a chair of informatics at the University of Karlsruhe. He also is the director of the European Institute for System Security (E.I.S.S.). In the past decade he has built up a research center for quantum information at the Institute for Algorithms and Cognitive Systems (IAKS). Professor Thomas Beth passed away in 2005.

Gerd Leuchs studied physics and mathematics at the University of Cologne and received his Ph.D. in 1978. After two research visits at the University of Colorado, Boulder, he headed the German Gravitational Wave Detection Group from 1985 to 1989. He then went on to be the technical director of Nanomach AG in Switzerland for four years. Since 1994 he holds the chair for optics at the Friedrich-Alexander-University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Germany. His fields of research span the range from modern aspects of classical optics to quantum optics and quantum information.
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Additional Information

Publisher
John Wiley & Sons
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Published on
Mar 6, 2006
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Pages
471
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ISBN
9783527606085
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Science / Physics / General
Science / Physics / Quantum Theory
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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How quantum computing is really done: a primer for future quantum device engineers.

This text offers an introduction to quantum computing, with a special emphasis on basic quantum physics, experiment, and quantum devices. Unlike many other texts, which tend to emphasize algorithms, Quantum Computing Without Magic explains the requisite quantum physics in some depth, and then explains the devices themselves. It is a book for readers who, having already encountered quantum algorithms, may ask, “Yes, I can see how the algebra does the trick, but how can we actually do it?” By explaining the details in the context of the topics covered, this book strips the subject of the “magic” with which it is so often cloaked. Quantum Computing Without Magic covers the essential probability calculus; the qubit, its physics, manipulation and measurement, and how it can be implemented using superconducting electronics; quaternions and density operator formalism; unitary formalism and its application to Berry phase manipulation; the biqubit, the mysteries of entanglement, nonlocality, separability, biqubit classification, and the Schroedinger's Cat paradox; the controlled-NOT gate, its applications and implementations; and classical analogs of quantum devices and quantum processes. Quantum Computing Without Magic can be used as a complementary text for physics and electronic engineering undergraduates studying quantum computing and basic quantum mechanics, or as an introduction and guide for electronic engineers, mathematicians, computer scientists, or scholars in these fields who are interested in quantum computing and how it might fit into their research programs.

Adiabatic quantum computation (AQC) is an alternative to the better-known gate model of quantum computation. The two models are polynomially equivalent, but otherwise quite dissimilar: one property that distinguishes AQC from the gate model is its analog nature. Quantum annealing (QA) describes a type of heuristic search algorithm that can be implemented to run in the ``native instruction set'' of an AQC platform. D-Wave Systems Inc. manufactures {quantum annealing processor chips} that exploit quantum properties to realize QA computations in hardware. The chips form the centerpiece of a novel computing platform designed to solve NP-hard optimization problems. Starting with a 16-qubit prototype announced in 2007, the company has launched and sold increasingly larger models: the 128-qubit D-Wave One system was announced in 2010 and the 512-qubit D-Wave Two system arrived on the scene in 2013. A 1,000-qubit model is expected to be available in 2014. This monograph presents an introductory overview of this unusual and rapidly developing approach to computation. We start with a survey of basic principles of quantum computation and what is known about the AQC model and the QA algorithm paradigm. Next we review the D-Wave technology stack and discuss some challenges to building and using quantum computing systems at a commercial scale. The last chapter reviews some experimental efforts to understand the properties and capabilities of these unusual platforms. The discussion throughout is aimed at an audience of computer scientists with little background in quantum computation or in physics.
Quantum Computation and Quantum Information (QIP) deals with the identification and use of quantum resources for information processing. This includes three main branches of investigation: quantum algorithm design, quantum simulation and
quantum communication, including quantum cryptography. Along the past few years, QIP has become one of the most active area of
research in both, theoretical and experimental physics, attracting students and researchers fascinated, not only by the potential
practical applications of quantum computers, but also by the possibility of studying fundamental physics at the deepest level of quantum phenomena.
NMR Quantum Computation and Quantum Information Processing describes the fundamentals of NMR QIP, and the main developments which can lead to a large-scale quantum processor. The text starts with a general chapter on
the interesting topic of the physics of computation. The very first ideas which sparkled the development of QIP came from basic considerations of the physical processes underlying computational actions. In Chapter 2 it is made an introduction to NMR, including the hardware and other experimental aspects of the technique. In
Chapter 3 we revise the fundamentals of Quantum Computation and Quantum Information. The chapter is very much based on the extraordinary book of Michael A. Nielsen and Isaac L. Chuang, with
an upgrade containing some of the latest developments, such as QIP in phase space, and telecloning. Chapter 4 describes how NMR
generates quantum logic gates from radiofrequency pulses, upon which quantum protocols are built. It also describes the important technique of Quantum State Tomography for both, quadrupole and spin
1/2 nuclei. Chapter 5 describes some of the main experiments of quantum algorithm implementation by NMR, quantum simulation and QIP in phase space. The important issue of entanglement in NMR QIP
experiments is discussed in Chapter 6. This has been a particularly exciting topic in the literature. The chapter contains a discussion
on the theoretical aspects of NMR entanglement, as well as some of the main experiments where this phenomenon is reported. Finally, Chapter 7 is an attempt to address the future of NMR QIP, based in
very recent developments in nanofabrication and single-spin detection experiments. Each chapter is followed by a number of problems and solutions.

* Presents a large number of problems with solutions, ideal for students
* Brings together topics in different areas: NMR, nanotechnology, quantum computation
* Extensive references
"Introduction to Quantum Computation" is an introduction to a new rapidly developing theory of quantum computing. The book is a comprehensive introduction to the main ideas and techniques of quantum computation. It begins with the basics of classical theory of computation: NP-complete problems, Boolean circuits, Finite state machine, Turing machine and the idea of complexity of an algorithm. The general quantum formalism (pure states, qubit, superposition, evolution of quantum system, entanglement, multi-qubit system ...) and complex algorithm examples are also presented. Matlab is a well known in engineer academia as matrix computing environment, which makes it well suited for simulating quantum algorithms. The (Quantum Computer Toolbox) QCT is written entirely in the Matlab and m-files are listed in book's sections. There are certain data types that are implicitly defined by the QCT, including data types for qubit registers and transformations. The QCT contains many functions designed to mimic the actions of a quantum computer. In addition, the QCT contains several convenience functions designed to aid in the creation and modification of the data types used in algorithms. The main purposes of the QCT are for research involving Quantum Computation and as a teaching tool to aid in learning about Quantum Computing systems. The readers will learn to implement complex quantum algorithm (quantum teleportation and Deutsch, Grover, Shor algorithm) under Matlab environment (complete Matlab code examples).
This book contains the proceedings of EUROCRYPT 85, held in Paris in 1984, April 9-11, at the University of Paris, Sorbonne. EIJROCRYPT is now an annual international European meeting in cryptology, intended primarily for the international of researchers in this area. EUROCRYPT 84 was community following previous meetings held at Burg Feuerstein in 1982 and at IJdine in 1983. In fact EUROCRYPT 84 was thc first such meeting being organized under IXCR (International Association of Cryptology Research). Other sponsors were the well-known French association on cybernetics research AFCET, the LITP (Laborstoire d' Informntique thcorique called et de Programmation), which is a laboratory of computer science associated with CNRS, and the department of mathematics and computer science at the Ilniversity RenE Descartcs, Sorbonne. EUROCRYPT 83 was very successfull, with about 180 participants from a great variety of foreign countries and 50 papers addressing all aspects of cryptology, close to applied as well as theoretical. It also had a special feature, i.e. a special session on smart cards particularly welcome at the time, since France was then carrying on an ambitious program on smart cards. EUROCRYPT 84 was a great experience. We like to thank all the sponsors and all the authors for their submission of papers. Pakin, Decemben 74ti4. CONTENTS SECTION I: GENERAL THEORY, CLASSICAL METHODS 3 Cryptology and Complexity Theories ... G. RLiGGTU 1 0 On Cryptosystems based on Folynomials md I'inite Fields.. ... R. irvi 16 Algehraical Structures of Cryptographic lransformations.. ...
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