The Sins of the Father: A Romance of the South

University Press of Kentucky
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" Today, Thomas Dixon is perhaps best known as the author of the best-selling early twentieth-century trilogy that included the novel The Clansman (1905), which provided the core narrative for D.W. Griffith's groundbreaking and still-controversial film The Birth of a Nation . It was The Sins of the Father , however, that Dixon regarded as the most aesthetically satisfying child of his Ku Klux Klan saga. In this novel he telescopes the trilogy's sprawling historical canvas into one tightly scripted narrative. A best-seller in 1912, the novel's themes of interracial sex and incest outraged many upon its publication. Nearly a century later, Dixon's work is undergoing a critical reevaluation. A new introduction by Steven Weisenburger lends a valuable historical and critical perspective to this important and divisive classic of American literature. Thomas Dixon (1864-1946) was born in Shelby, North Carolina. He is also the author of The Clansman and The Flaming Sword. Steven Weisenburger, Mossiker Chair in Humanities at Southern Methodist University, is the author of several books, including Modern Medea: A Family Story of Slavery and Child- murder from the Old South.
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About the author

Thomas Dixon is Senior Lecturer in History at Queen Mary, University of London. He is the author of The Invention of Altruism (2008) and From Passions to Emotions (Cambridge, 2003).

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Additional Information

Publisher
University Press of Kentucky
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Published on
Dec 17, 2004
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Pages
352
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ISBN
9780813172101
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Language
English
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Genres
Fiction / Historical
Fiction / Literary
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Content Protection
This content is DRM free.
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