Forgotten Heroes of World War II: Personal Accounts of Ordinary Soldiers—Land, Sea, and Air, Edition 2

Rowman & Littlefield
11
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World War II was the defining event of the twentieth century. For everyone it was a time of confusion, fear, destruction, and death on a scale never before seen. Much has been written of the generals, campaigns, and battles of the war, but it was young, ordinary American kids who held our freedom in their hands as they fought for liberty across the globe. Forgotten Heroes of World War II offers a personal understanding of what was demanded of these young heroes through the stories of rank-and-file individuals who served in the navy, marines, army, air corps, and merchant marine in all theaters of the war. Their tales are told without pretense or apology. At the time, each thought himself no different from those around him, for they were all young, scared, and miserable. They were the ordinary, the extraordinary—the forgotten.
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About the author

Thomas E. Simmons is the author of The Brown Condor, Escape from Archangel, and The Man Called Brown Condor. He has served as commercial captain of a seventy-foot sailing vessel, been a pilot since the age of sixteen, flown professionally, and participated in air shows flying aerobatics in open-cockpit bi-planes. In 1960 he served as an artillery officer in Korea. He lives in Gulfport, Mississippi.
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4.8
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Additional Information

Publisher
Rowman & Littlefield
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Published on
Nov 6, 2014
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Pages
326
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ISBN
9781589799646
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Military / Veterans
History / Military / World War II
History / United States / 20th Century
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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" With a foreword by Stephen Ambrose and a preface by Franklin D. Anderson Forrest Pogue (1912-1996) was undoubtedly one of the greatest World War II combat historians. Born and educated in Kentucky, he is perhaps best known for his definitive four-volume biography of General George C. Marshall. But, as PogueÕs War makes clear, he was also a pioneer in the development of oral history in the twentieth century, as well as an impressive interviewer with an ability to relate to people at all levels, from the private in the trenches to the general carrying four stars. PogueÕs War is drawn from Forrest PogueÕs handwritten pocket notebooks, carried with him throughout the war, long regarded as unreadable because of his often atrocious handwriting. Pogue himself began expanding the diaries a few short years after the war, with the intent of eventual publication. At last this work is being published. Supplemented with carefully deciphered and transcribed selections from his diaries, the heart of the book is straight from the field. Much of the material has never before seen print. From D-Day to VE-Day, Pogue experienced and documented combat on the front lines, describing action on Omaha Beach, in the Huertgen Forest, and on other infamous fields of conflict. He not only graphicallyÑyet also often poetically__Ñrecounts the extreme circumstances of battle, but he also notes his fellow soldiersÕ innermost thoughts, feelings, opinions, and attitudes about the cruelty of war. As a trained historian, Pogue describes how he went about his work and how the ArmyÕs history program functioned in the European Theater of Operations. His entries from his time at the history headquarters in Paris show the city in the early days after the liberation in a unique light. PogueÕs War has an immediacy that much official history lacks, and is a remarkable addition to any World War II bookshelf. Franklin D. Anderson, Forrest PogueÕs nephew by marriage, is a longtime educator. He lives in Princeton, Kentucky.
During World War II, merchant marine tankers in convoys plied the frozen North Atlantic through the flaming wreckage of torpedoed ships. Working to keep sea lanes open, valiant merchant seamen supplied food, fuel, and goods to the Allies in the last pockets of European resistance to the Nazis.

This exciting book acknowledges that the merchant marines, all volunteers, are among the unsung heroes of the war. One of these was Jac Smith, an ordinary seamen on the Cedar Creek, a new civilian tanker lend-leased to the U.S.S.R. and in the merchantman convoy running from Scotland to Murmansk. Smith's riveting adventures at sea and in the frozen taigas and tundra are a story of valor that underlines the essential role of merchant marines in the war against the Axis powers.

This gripping narrative tells of a cruel blow that fate dealt Smith when, after volunteering to serve on the tanker headed for Murmansk, he was arrested and interned in a Soviet work camp near Arkhangelsk.

Escape from Archangel recounts how this American happened to be imprisoned in an Allied country and how he planned and managed his escape. In his arduous 900-mile trek to freedom, he encountered the remarkable Laplanders of the far north and brave Norwegian resistance fighters. While telling this astonishing story of Jac Smith and of the awesome dangers merchant seamen endured while keeping commerce alive on the seascape of war, Escape from Archangel brings long-deserved attention to the role of the merchant marine and their sacrifices during wartime.

DUTY, HONOR, COUNTRY
The eighty-four men and women who tell their stories exemplify these words. From the home front to the battlefront and from behind the lines, their words speak of loss, pain, fear, loneliness, selflessness, faith and hope. As one veteran said, “World War II caused me to understand that I served my country for a purpose greater than myself.”

Many of these soldiers, sailors, airmen and Marines served in nearly every major battle in Europe and the Pacific including: Pearl Harbor, the invasion of Normandy, the Battle of the Bulge, Guadalcanal, Iwo Jima and Okinawa.

Their sacrifice for our country is a debt which cannot be repaid. They represent the best of “The Greatest Generation.”

"This book is a fitting tribute to those Hoosiers who gave their all for the cause of freedom during World War II. The personal stories of those who served offer a window into a time that should be remembered."
-Ray Boomhower, Indiana historian and author

“Hodgin and Hardwick have produced an interesting and informative compendium of World War II stories of veterans that should instill a sense of pride in students and adults of all ages. The book has a readable style of a period in our history that we would do well not to forget.”
John Shively, M.D., Author and WW II historian

“A must read for both historians and those desiring to learn more about one of the most decisive periods in our nation’s history. The authors have not only captured the veterans’ stories but also the sights and sounds of what many were thinking when facing death, hardships and struggling to survive.”
J. Stewart Goodwin, Brig. Gen., USAF (Ret), Executive Director, Indiana War Memorials

“This book is an absorbing collection of stories from the men and women of the “Greatest Generation.” Their stories illustrate some of the pain and incredible atrocities they witnessed, and at the same time, the friendships and joys they experienced. A must read for every person who wants to know what it was really like during WW II.”
Charles “Tom” Applegate, Director, Indiana Department of Veterans Affairs

Faithful Warriors is a memoir of World War II in the Pacific by a combat veteran of the 8th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division. Written with award-winning author Steven Weingartner, Ladd’s book chronicles his experiences as a junior officer in some of the fiercest fighting of the war in the Pacific. His recollections and descriptions of life--and death--on the far-flung island battlefronts of the Pacific War are vividly rendered, augmented by the recollections of a number of the men with whom he served.

This memoir tells the story of how both Ladd and the Marine Corps came of age during history’s greatest military conflict. His journey through the war is representative of many Marines in World War II: training outside of San Diego just before the war, awaiting the Japanese attack after Pearl Harbor as part of the Marine garrison on Samoa, surviving the savage fighting on Guadalcanal, resting and recuperating afterwards in New Zealand; participating in the bloodbath on Tarawa; recovering in Hawaii after being wounded; and returning to face combat yet again on Saipan and Tinian.

Ladd is at his best when he is describes exactly what he saw, heard, and smelled within the mythical 50-yard circle of his foxhole. From his narrative we learn of the bravery of men who mustered the courage to scramble down the nets for the landing craft, after facing the veteran’s fatalistic fear that one's luck in surviving the next battle would surely run out and knowing the ferocity that would come.
“Riveting, with a style and pace that take the reader on the journey with John Robinson—the African American man called the brown condor” (New York Journal of Books).
 
In this gripping, never-before-told tale, biographer Thomas E. Simmons brings to life the true story of John C. Robinson, who rose from fraught and humble beginnings as a black child in segregated Mississippi to outstanding success. He became a pilot and an expert in building and assembling his own working aircraft; he also helped to establish a school of aviation at the Tuskegee Institute (there would have been no Tuskegee Airmen without him); and his courageous wartime service in Ethiopia during the Italian invasion in 1935 won him international fame.
 
Featuring thirty-five black-and-white photographs and based on twenty-three years’ worth of original research, when very little information on this remarkable American hero was available, The Man Called Brown Condor is more than just a biography of an unfairly forgotten African American pilot; this book provides insight on racial conditions in the first half of the twentieth century and on the rise of fascism in the years preceding World War II.
 
“[Robinson’s] lifelong triumph over adversity belongs to the greatest of American success stories.” —The Washington Times
 
“Simmons brings to life Robinson’s inspiring struggle against racism through the story of how he rose to become the commander of Haile Selassie’s air force in Ethiopia’s attempt to defend itself against Mussolini’s brutal invasion . . . An inspiring affirmation that celebrates the old adage that where there’s a will, there’s a way, even against seemingly impossible odds.” —Kirkus Reviews
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