Cocaine Nation: How the White Trade Took Over the World

Pegasus Books
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Cutting through the myths about the white trade, this is the story of cocaine as it's never been told before.

Cocaine is big business and getting bigger. Governments spend millions on a losing war against it, yet it’s still the drug of choice in the West.

In Cocaine Nation, Tom Feiling travels the trade routes from Colombia via Miami, Kingston, and Tijuana to London and New York. Cutting through the myths about the white trade, this is the story of cocaine as it’s never been told before.

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About the author

Tom Feiling is an award-winning documentary filmmaker. He spent a year working in South America where he made Resistencia: Hip-Hop in Colombia, which won numerous awards at film festivals around the world. He now lives in London where he is a director for ‘Justice for Colombia,’ which defends human rights in Colombia. Cocaine Nation is his first book.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Pegasus Books
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Published on
Feb 15, 2012
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Pages
356
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ISBN
9781605987569
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Social History
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • Pulitzer Prize–winning author Jon Meacham helps us understand the present moment in American politics and life by looking back at critical times in our history when hope overcame division and fear.

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