The Christian's Duty to Reject Christmas

Puritan Publications
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Mockett’s argument in this work is directed to well-meaning Christians who are defiling the Regulative Principle – that God alone determines the manner and time in which sinners are to approach him. Writing against the, “observation of Christ’s nativity,” Mockett shows the Christian how he is to reject, whole-heartily, adding Christ into Christmas as a religious or worship observance. 


Mr. Mockett is not going to deal with taking Christ out of Christmas. Instead, he is going to painstakingly demonstrate the ill-use of trying to reclaim Christ for Christmas as an unholy venture. He will show that it is a detestable, sinful practice to put Christ back into Christmas since men have no warrant from God to do so. Though they do this in pretense of honoring Christ in a day of worship, and do so with a sincere heart, as Mockett shows, “Good intentions and well meanings cannot justify any unwarrantable practice.”


Mockett’s treatment of this issue is clear and well documented. The student of Scripture and historical theology cannot but come away with believing that reclaiming Christ in Christmas is truly a violation of God’s word, and a sinful practice which has harmed the church throughout its history.

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About the author

Thomas Mockett (or Mocket) (1602-1670), was a studious theologian, Reformed preacher of the Gospel, and scholarly puritan divine during the era of Westminster. Edmund Calamy describes him as, “a very pious, and humble man.”


C. Matthew McMahon, Ph.D., Th.D., is an American Calvinist Reformed theologian and adjunct professor at Whitefield Theological Seminary. He is the founder and chairman of A Puritan's Mind, the largest Reformed website on the internet for students of the Bible concerning Reformed Theology, the Puritans and Covenant Theology. He is also the founder of Puritan Publications which publishes rare Reformed and Puritan works from the 17th century.


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Additional Information

Publisher
Puritan Publications
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Published on
Nov 9, 2015
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Pages
109
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ISBN
9781626631601
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Language
English
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Genres
Religion / Christian Life / Personal Growth
Religion / Christian Life / Spiritual Growth
Religion / Christian Rituals & Practice / General
Religion / Christian Theology / Systematic
Religion / Christianity / Calvinist
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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Thomas Mockett
What does it mean to be a Christian who has forsaken the world for Jesus Christ? This idea is a basic tenant of Christian truth. From various texts in Matthew 13 concerning the Kingdom of God and the incomparable excellency of Jesus Christ, Mockett teaches that every Christian should, and the wise Christian will, willingly part with all for Christ and the grace of the Gospel. He shows what it means to “part with all for Jesus Christ”, and what Christians “are to part with” for Jesus Christ. 


Christians must see Christ as more excellent to anything that exists in the world. Mockett says, “In this way, you see how excellent Jesus Christ is; He is co-essential, co-eternal, and co-equal with the Father, and the Holy Spirit, almighty and all-sufficient, omniscient, and most wise, true and faithful, most holy, exceeding good, abundant in mercy and compassion, and altogether lovely and desirable, the most amiable object that ever the eye of man’s understanding did or possibly can behold or enjoy.”


This work teaches us how to reject everything else in the world as beneath Jesus Christ, and shows the Christian what steps to take in having high thoughts of Christ, and lower thoughts of the things in the world. Anyone who does not forsake the world cannot be a disciple of Christ. This teaching is of utmost importance to the contemporary church, especially in today’s intolerant culture where status, goods and relations are often more important than the Gospel of grace, or the God of all grace, Jesus Christ.  


The question then remains, how much of the world have you forsaken? Some of it, part of it, a little bit of it? Most of it? Or all of it? To be a child of the Kingdom, and a disciple of Jesus, you must forsake everything for him.


This is not a scan or facsimile, has been updated in modern English for easy reading and has an active table of contents for electronic versions.

Thomas Mockett
Mockett’s work is a puritan example of Scriptural exegesis at its final points, engaging in a systematic explanation of what Puritanism considered practical theology. Practical Theology is the “application” of the biblical text, drawn from its doctrinal considerations, which pertain to the life and work of the individual Christian, and the body of the Christian church. It covers private duties, family duties, Christian church duties, and duties to our rulers and neighbors. 


Practically, this work demonstrates a focused course of practical application, dealing with the practice of being a true Christian in 27 points. His purpose in this is that the reader will not miss the glory of Jesus Christ, and an entrance into an eternal heaven for the glory of God. He covers such topics as a right knowledge of God and Jesus Christ; having a lively faith; the importance of self-examination; what it means to have a lawful calling; how to deal responsibly with prosperity, adversity and temptation. The importance of unity, peace and love; what it means to have a true fear of God; and a section on parents, children, masters, servants and dealing with the poor, among other chapters. 


This is one of the few known Puritan works on practical theology, and is a must read for any Christian desiring to have a sanctifying and practical interest in Jesus Christ.  


This is not a scan or facsimile, has been updated in modern English for easy reading and has an active table of contents for electronic versions. 

Brant Pitre
In recent years, Christians everywhere are rediscovering the Jewish roots of their faith.

Every year at Easter time, many believers now celebrate Passover meals (known as Seders) seeking to understand exactly what happened at Jesus’ final Passover, the night before he was crucified.
  
Jesus and the Jewish Roots of the Eucharist shines fresh light on the Last Supper by looking at it through Jewish eyes. Using his in-depth knowledge of the Bible and ancient Judaism, Dr. Brant Pitre answers questions such as: What was the Passover like at the time of Jesus? What were the Jewish hopes for the Messiah? What was Jesus’ purpose in instituting the Eucharist during the feast of Passover? And, most important of all, what did Jesus mean when he said, “This is my body… This is my blood”?

To answer these questions, Pitre explores ancient Jewish beliefs about the Passover of the Messiah, the miraculous Manna from heaven, and the mysterious Bread of the Presence. As he shows, these three keys—the Passover, the Manna, and the Bread of the Presence—have the power to unlock the original meaning of the Eucharistic words of Jesus. Along the way, Pitre also explains how Jesus united the Last Supper to his death on Good Friday and his Resurrection on Easter Sunday.           

Inspiring and informative, Jesus and the Jewish Roots of the Eucharist is a groundbreaking work that is sure to illuminate one of the greatest mysteries of the Christian faith: the mystery of Jesus’ presence in “the breaking of the bread.”
Thomas Mockett
Mockett has taken the twofold instance of Abraham’s trouble and deliverance by God, and applies this pastorally to the Christian walk. He shows through the historical narrative of Abraham’s testing, that God does bring his people into trouble, and will deliver them. He gives a number of reasons why God brings his people into trouble, and what the Christian duty is while under such testing or proving. He dissects the nature of Christian trouble masterfully: that such afflictions and trials are light and short, momentary in the great scheme of redemption and our salvation; and that they are a means by which Christians are made fit for mercy. God prepares his vessels by a refining fire to make them fit to hold his grace, peace and mercy for our good. Mockett demonstrates the true reality that God will rescue his people from such troubles, in his time and providence, and shows why he rescues them: to vindicate his people from their enemies, and to manifest his glorious attributes of knowledge, power, truth, faithfulness, and goodness. 


Mockett has taken an historically and theologically packed section of the Bible in Genesis and masterfully, deeply and encouragingly applied that to today’s believer. This work is among the best of his expositions because Mockett felt this topic was a regular course found in the Christian’s daily walk.


This is not a scan or facsimile, has been updated in modern English for easy reading and has an active table of contents for electronic versions.

Richard Allestree
Richard Allestree says, “meditation is a serious and solemn considering of heavenly things in the word of God, to the end that Christians may understand how much of God’s word concerns them, and that their hearts may be raised to holy passion and resolution to do what it says every day they live here on earth.”

Godly meditation is part of the three legs to the stool of a Christian’s spiritual devotions. Spiritual devotions, or the three spiritual disciplines comprise Bible reading, prayer and pondering the word of God, or what we call godly meditation. This meditation is the musing and mental study of heavenly truths. It is working the practical truths of the Bible into one’s soul. In this, Christians are captivated with God’s disclosure of heavenly truths to them in the bible. In the bible God displays himself to them. God is the infinite First-being, worthy of all love for Himself, and communicates that love to His people. They in turn love him back. Loving him back includes thinking about him. Though Christians live in the world, they have communion with the God of heaven through the word of God, throughout the whole course of their lives. They do this through godly meditation.

Allestree not only shows what meditation is, and how it is to be done, but gives the reader twenty-eight meditations so that he can enter into a profitable time of daily meditation by practical example.

This work is not a scan or facsimile, has been carefully transcribed by hand being made easy to read in modern English, and has an active table of contents for electronic versions.
Jeremiah Burroughs
The bible is filled with a theology of walking. This supernatural, and eminently important topic, is the substance of this discourse by master-exegete and preacher Jeremiah Burroughs (1599-1646). This work is laid out in a series of “rules” which demonstrate to the Christian what one looks like who in fact walks with God.

Burroughs’ main text is, “And Enoch walked with God: and he was not; for God took him.” (Gen. 5:24). His main doctrine from this text is that it is the great excellency and commendation of a godly man to walk with God. Or, that it is the highest testimony that can be given that a man walks with God.

He covers how a person is brought to walk with God shown in six particulars. Then he defines, specifically, what it means to walk with God, and their extended excellencies, along with exhortations to both Christians and unbelievers as to their interest in walking with God. Then, he provides ten ways that show people in the church, and even people in the world, that a man is walking with God, or not. Lastly, he demonstrates biblical “rules” toward walking with God in the right manner.

The last chapter is actually an extra-added section that Burroughs decided he could not write this work without. That chapter is worth its weight in gold, and alone is worth the time of reading this volume. It houses the objection concerning the manner in which God sometimes may hide his face from his people for their good; though, at the time, it surely doesn’t feel as though desertion is a good thing. Burroughs covers being self-deceived in this, and answers various particulars concerning how to rightly judge whether one is actually walking with God in the right way, whether one is deserted by God, and whether such a desertion warrants repentance or just right thinking.

This work is not a scan or facsimile, has been carefully transcribed by hand being made easy to read in modern English, and has an active table of contents for electronic versions.
C. Matthew McMahon
 There is nothing like the Reformed Apprentice workbook series anywhere in the Christian community. It is designed to bring Reformed Theology to Christians seeking a deeper walk with Jesus Christ in the form of a workbook, not simply a text to read. 


In old England, an apprentice was a novice who engaged in a covenant with a tradesman to learn a particular trade. A workbook of this kind for today’s Christian, was created to engage the student of the Bible to be apprenticed under the historical pastors, theologians and teachers of Reformed Theology. As the Christian learns and grows in Christ through the Bible, they mature into a Reformed Apprentice.


As with each of the workbooks in this series, its purpose is to guide the Christian into a deeper knowledge and relationship with the Lord Jesus Christ, as he has revealed himself to the church in his Word and by his Spirit through the centuries in Reformed Theology. Cultivating a relationship with Christ takes work; and every Christian is commanded by God to have communion with the Father, through Christ, in the power of the Spirit. How powerful is your devotional life? 


This volume specifically covers the three spiritual disciplines which make up private devotions in bible reading and study, prayer and godly meditation. It extensively quotes the Reformers, the Puritans, and Reformed theologians from various ages in order to aid the Reformed Apprentice in coming to a knowledge of what truly constitutes biblical private devotions as taught in Scripture, Reformed Theology and the Reformed Faith.

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