Host Defenses to Intracellular Pathogens: Proceedings of a conference held in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, June 10-12, 1981

Springer Science & Business Media
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The subject matter of this volume was the basis for a confer ence held in Philadelphia in June, 1981, and is an important one in the contemporary area of how the host interacts with micro organisms. In conception, it grew out of a graduate course entitled, "The Infectious Process," which has been taught in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology at Temple University School of Medicine during the past twelve years. This course has explored the broad areas of mechanisms of microbial pathogenesis and host resistance by in-depth consideration of selected models of experimental infection and immunity, as well as the clinical literature. It is noteworthy that there is no adequate text for this material, as the subject matter naturally crosses a wide spectrum of traditional disciplinary lines, encompassing topics as diverse as the mechanisms of action of bacterial toxins, the role of complement and antibody in phagocytosis, and the importance of cross-reacting bacterial polysaccharide antigens in vaccine development. A major portion of the course has always considered "cellular immunity" as it applies to host defenses to intracellular pathogens. It is in this area that the necessity for amalgamation of information from different disciplines is most evident, for one must be intimately concerned with the interactions between the microbe and the phagocyte, both before and after specific immune recognition.
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Publisher
Springer Science & Business Media
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Published on
Dec 6, 2012
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Pages
538
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ISBN
9781468444810
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Medical / Immunology
Science / Life Sciences / Cell Biology
Science / Life Sciences / Microbiology
Science / Life Sciences / Molecular Biology
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This content is DRM protected.
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The role of folylpolyglutamates in biosynthetic processes has gained increasing importance with the recognition that these com pounds are not only the forms of folate co-factors that accumulate within cells, but, in addition, are the preferred substrates for folate dependent reactions in eukaryotic cells. More recently attention has turned to the potential importance of the polyglutamyl derivatives of methotrexate that have been detected in normal and malignant cells both in vitro and in vivo. The biochemical trans formation of this important chemotherapeutic agent is of particular significance since polyglutamyl derivatives of methotrexate are not only potent inhibitors of the target enzyme, but have quite different cellular pharmacokinetics than the parent monoglutamate. Hence, nearly three and a half decades after 4-aminoantifolates were first applied clinically in the treatment of human neoplasms, we have begun to appreciate a new dimension in antifolate pharmaco logy which may have profound implications for our understanding of the mechanism of the cytotoxicity and selectivity of this class of agents. With the development of highly sensitive methodology for the rapid detection of folyl and antifolyl polyglutamates, it is now possible to define in depth the intracellular transformation of these agents and their role in determining antifolate action against normal and malignant cells. This information will very likely influence how regimens with methotrexate and related antifolates will be further developed and employed clinically.
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This comprehensive treatise on the reticuloendothelial system is a project jointly shared by individual members of the Reticuloendothelial (RE) Society and bio medical scientists in general who are interested in the intricate system of cells and molecular moieties derived from these cells which constitute the RES. It may now be more fashionable in some quarters to consider these cells as part of what is called the mononuclear phagocytic system or the lymphoreticular system. Nevertheless, because of historical developments and current interest in the subject by investigators from many diverse areas, it seems advantageous to present in one comprehensive treatise current information and knowledge con cerning basic aspects of the RES, such as morphology, biochemistry, phylogeny and ontogeny, physiology, and pharmacology as well as clinical areas including immunopathology, cancer, infectious diseases, allergy, and hypersensitivity. It is anticipated that by presenting information concerning these apparently heterogeneous topics under the unifying umbrella of the RES attention will be focused on the similarities as well as interactions among the cell types constitut ing the RES from the viewpoint of various disciplines. The treatise editors and their editorial board, consisting predominantly of the editors of individual vol umes, are extremely grateful for the enthusiastic cooperation and enormous task undertaken by members of the biomedical community in general and especially by members of the American as well as European and Japanese Reticuloendothe lial Societies.
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