The Long Nineteenth Century, 1750-1914: Crucible of Modernity

Bloomsbury Publishing
Free sample

The Long Nineteenth Century, 1750-1914 is a global history textbook with a difference. It is a guide for students to the actions and experiences by which communities and individuals in different parts of the world constructed, contested, and were affected by major trends and events in the global past.

The book explores the global history of the 19th century holistically. Its content is framed in chapters that tackle themes rather than geographic regions or chronological sub-divisions. Moreover, in order to connect human experiences and perspectives with global trends and events, each chapter – whether it focuses on politics or religion, economics or environment – is underpinned by an approach emphasizes social and cultural history.

Through its pages, students critically encounter important global trends and key events from the Industrial Revolution to the Taiping Heavenly Kingdom. The book ends with an epilogue on the First World War that brings all of the themes of the volume together in one place and also provides a segue into the mid-20th century.
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About the author

Trevor R. Getz is Professor of History at San Francisco State University, USA. He is a historian of modern Africa and the world. He is the author of Abina and the Important Men (second edition 2015), the first of Oxford University Press' new Graphic Histories series and winner of the James Harvey Robinson Prize from the American Historical Association.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Bloomsbury Publishing
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Published on
Oct 4, 2018
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Pages
256
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ISBN
9781474270557
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Modern / 19th Century
History / Modern / General
History / World
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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The revolutions around the globe in the 19th century have had an enormous impact on the course of history. To help students better understand the major developments in the tumultuous 19th century and their impact on the 20th century, this unique resource offers detailed description and expert analysis of the 19th century's most important events: The Napoleonic Era, the Congress of Vienna and the Age of Metternich, the Latin American Wars of Independence, the Reform Bill of 1832, the Revolutions of 1848, the Emancipation of the Russian Serfs, the Meiji Restoration, the Unification of Germany, Marxism and the Rise of Socialism, and Imperialism. Each of the ten events is dealt with in a separate chapter. Designed for students, the unique format features an introductory essay that presents the facts, followed by an interpretive essay that places the event in a broader context and promotes student analysis.

The introductory essay provides factual material about the event in a clear, concise, chronological manner that makes complex history understandable. The interpretive essay, written by a recognized authority in the field in a style designed to appeal to a general readership, explores the short-term and far-reaching ramifications of the event. An annotated bibliography identifies the most important and recent scholarship about each event. A full-page photo of each event complements the narrative. This volume contains four useful appendices: a glossary of names, events, and terms; a timeline of important events in 19th-century world history; the comparative population of selected countries in the 19th century; and countries colonized during the Imperial Scramble of 1870-1914. This work is an ideal addition to the high school, community college, and undergraduate reference shelf, as well as excellent for supplementary reading in social studies and world history courses.

Winner, 2018 PEN/E.O. Wilson Prize for Literary Science Writing
Short-listed for the 2018 Wellcome Book Prize
A Top 10 Science Book of Fall 2017, Publishers Weekly
A Best History Book of 2017, The Guardian

"Warning: She spares no detail!" —Erik Larson, bestselling author of Dead Wake

In The Butchering Art, the historian Lindsey Fitzharris reveals the shocking world of nineteenth-century surgery and shows how it was transformed by advances made in germ theory and antiseptics between 1860 and 1875. She conjures up early operating theaters—no place for the squeamish—and surgeons, who, working before anesthesia, were lauded for their speed and brute strength. These pioneers knew that the aftermath of surgery was often more dangerous than patients’ afflictions, and they were baffled by the persistent infections that kept mortality rates stubbornly high. At a time when surgery couldn’t have been more hazardous, an unlikely figure stepped forward: a young, melancholy Quaker surgeon named Joseph Lister, who would solve the riddle and change the course of history.

Fitzharris dramatically reconstructs Lister’s career path to his audacious claim that germs were the source of all infection and could be countered by a sterilizing agent applied to wounds. She introduces us to Lister’s contemporaries—some of them brilliant, some outright criminal—and leads us through the grimy schools and squalid hospitals where they learned their art, the dead houses where they studied, and the cemeteries they ransacked for cadavers.

Eerie and illuminating, The Butchering Art celebrates the triumph of a visionary surgeon whose quest to unite science and medicine delivered us into the modern world.

A series of transformations, reforms, and attempted abolitions of slavery form a core narrative of nineteenth-century coastal West Africa. As the region's role in Atlantic commercial networks underwent a gradual transition from principally that of slave exporter to producer of “legitimate goods” and dependent markets, institutions of slavery became battlegrounds in which European abolitionism, pragmatic colonialism, and indigenous agency clashed.

In Slavery and Reform in West Africa, Trevor Getz demonstrates that it was largely on the anvil of this issue that French and British policy in West Africa was forged. With distant metropoles unable to intervene in daily affairs, local European administrators, striving to balance abolitionist pressures against the resistance of politically and economically powerful local slave owners, sought ways to satisfy the latter while placating or duping the former.

The result was an alliance between colonial officials, company agents, and slave-owning elites that effectively slowed, sidetracked, or undermined serious attempts to reform slave holding. Although slavery was outlawed in both regions, in only a few isolated instances did large-scale emancipations occur. Under the surface, however, slaves used the threat of self-liberation to reach accommodations that transformed the master-slave relationship.

By comparing the strategies of colonial administrators, slave-owners, and slaves across these two regions and throughout the nineteenth century, Slavery and Reform in West Africa reveals not only the causes of the astounding success of slave owners, but also the factors that could, and in some cases did, lead to slave liberations. These findings have serious implications for the wider study of slavery and emancipation and for the history of Africa generally.
Lancaster and York. For much of the fifteenth century, these two families were locked in battle for control of the British monarchy. Kings were murdered and deposed. Armies marched on London. Old noble names were ruined while rising dynasties seized power and lands. The war between the royal House of Lancaster and York, the longest and most complex in British history, profoundly altered the course of the monarchy. In The Wars of the Roses, Alison Weir reconstructs this conflict with the same dramatic flair and impeccable research that she brought to her highly praised The Princes in the Tower.

The first battle erupted in 1455, but the roots of the conflict reached back to the dawn of the fifteenth century, when the corrupt, hedonistic Richard II was sadistically murdered, and Henry IV, the first Lancastrian king, seized England's throne. Both Henry IV and his son, the cold warrior Henry V, ruled England ably, if not always wisely--but Henry VI proved a disaster, both for his dynasty and his kingdom. Only nine months old when his father's sudden death made him king, Henry VI became a tormented and pathetic figure, weak, sexually inept, and prey to fits of insanity. The factional fighting that plagued his reign escalated into bloody war when Richard Plantagenet, Duke of York, laid claim to the throne that was rightfully his--and backed up his claim with armed might.

Alison Weir brings brilliantly to life both the war itself and the historic figures who fought it on the great stage of England. Here are the queens who changed history through their actions--the chic, unconventional Katherine of Valois, Henry V's queen; the ruthless, social-climbing Elizabeth Wydville; and, most crucially, Margaret of Anjou, a far tougher and more powerful character than her husband,, Henry VI, and a central figure in the Wars of the Roses.

Here, too, are the nobles who carried the conflict down through the generations--the Beauforts, the bastard descendants of John of Gaunt, Richard Neville, Earl of Warwick, known to his contemporaries as "the Kingmaker"; and the Yorkist King, Edward IV, a ruthless charmer who pledged his life to cause the downfall of the House of Lancaster.

The Wars of the Roses is history at its very best--swift and compelling, rich in character, pageantry, and drama, and vivid in its re-creation of an astonishing, dangerous, and often grim period of history. Alison Weir, one of the foremost authorities on the British royal family, demonstrates here that she is also one of the most dazzling stylists writing history today.
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