Naturalopy: The Complete Reference

EnCognitive.com
12

This is the complete Naturalopy reference. It includes all 20 precepts in 1,112 pages. 

Within the pages of this book are the answers to life from Humanity's greatest thinkers.

--Where did we come from?

--What is our purpose in life?

--Why do bad things happen to us?

--Is there a god?

--Are we alone in the Universe?

--What happens to us after we die?

 

Read more
4.4
12 total
Loading...

Additional Information

Publisher
EnCognitive.com
Read more
Published on
Jan 12, 2015
Read more
Pages
1112
Read more
ISBN
9781927091104
Read more
Language
English
Read more
Genres
Body, Mind & Spirit / General
Read more
Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
Read more
Eligible for Family Library

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.
This is the first book in the Future Dark series.


In 2194, Mars is colonized. The descendants of 21st century industrialist Elon Musk, founder of Musk City, Mars, form the ruling elite on the Red Planet. The Musk clan is about to face a historical event as one of their own, Lazar Musk Whittaker, a Biomech, embarks on an ambitious undertaking to change the course of human evolution. 


The war of the species and the fracture within the Musk clan begin when four tombs are discovered encased in an asteroid in a mining facility on Phobos, one of Mars’ two moons. As the Martians soon discover, these tombs contain the bodies of four aliens.

In the future, Earth is a multi-humanoid society of Naturalopists (natural humans), Biomechs (biological-mechanical beings), cyborgs (part machine-part human), milbots (military robots), cilbots (civilian robots), and wobots (worker robots).


“I liked this novel a lot...The plot of this novel is its strongest element...The author can put together a very strong plot, with plenty of twists and turns, and a good ending. There are some very suspenseful moments, and levels of tension are created which at their best evoke the sensations of a fine horror story. And the author, by and large, appears to have done his/her homework. The novel also has sociological touches which work well, especially its view of futuristic mega-capitalism. The venality, blindness, and excess of Udell Whittaker and his flunkeys is very believable, and adds depth to the story. The manner of day to day life, both in space and on the ‘colonies' of Mars seems well-researched and is often fascinating to the lay reader…” — Writers Guild of Alberta

"Polio is NOT even contagious or infectious (never proven to be). There is NO proof Polio is caused by a virus. There is NO evidence that anyone caught polio from another person in the family. There is NO evidence that any nurse or doctor caught polio from a patient." —Sheri Nakken, RN, MA


Listed below are public health statistics (U.S. Public Health Reports) from the four states which adopted compulsory vaccination, and the figures from Los Angeles, California (similar results in other states available from books listed at the back of this booklet): 


TENNESSEE

1958: 119 cases of polio before compulsory shots 

1959: 386 cases of polio after compulsory shots 


OHIO


1958: 17 cases of polio before compulsory shots 

1959: 52 cases of polio after compulsory shots 


CONNECTICUT


1958: 45 cases of polio before compulsory shots 

1959: 123 cases of polio after compulsory shots 


NORTH CAROLINA


1958: 78 cases of polio before compulsory shots 

1959: 313 cases of polio after compulsory shots 


LOS ANGELES


1958: 89 cases of polio before shots 

1959: 190 cases of polio after shots 


The decline of smallpox, as with many other infectious diseases, including diphtheria and scarlet fever, coincided with the sanitation reforms which were instituted in the late 1880s. Where obtainable, government health records from around the world showed that during the periods of the most intense and widespread vaccination, the incidence of and death rates from smallpox were highest. For instance, in Kansas City and Pittsburgh during the 1920s, lawsuits were initiated, and won, against doctors and medical societies for declaring smallpox epidemics when there were none, and for creating epidemics with their vaccination drives. 


Before 1903, smallpox was almost unknown in the Philippines, with occurrences in less than 3% of the population, and that in a mild form. The U.S. military went in and began vaccinating, and by 1905 the Philippines had its first major epidemic. Vaccination was made compulsory in 1910. From 1905 to 1923, the mortality rate ranged from 25-75%, depending on the count from the various islands. “The mortality rate was the highest in the cities where vaccination was most intense.” Dr. W.W. Keen reported 130,264 cases and 74,369 deaths from smallpox in 1921. 


Japan adopted compulsory vaccinations in 1872 when they had only a few cases of smallpox. By 1892 they had the largest smallpox epidemic in their history with 165,774 cases and 29,979 deaths. 

Australia banned the smallpox vaccine after some children were killed by it, and in the following 15 years in unvaccinated Australia there were only 3 cases of smallpox. 

The smallpox vaccine was discontinued in the United States after Dr. Henry Kempe reported to Congress in 1966 that fewer people were dying from the disease than from vaccination. 

©2018 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google|Location: United StatesLanguage: English (United States)
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.