Urban Social Movements in Jerusalem: The Protest of the Second Generation

SUNY Press
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Hasson explores the development of eight urban protest organizations in Israel, revealing how social deprivation is transformed into organized patterns of activity. To investigate how and why urban movements evolve, he depicts the housing and social conditions in which members of Jerusalem’s second generation found themselves. He follows their trajectories: analyzes the process of organization building and the formation of urban social movements; the conflict between charismatic, protest powers and the state; the routinization of charisma. He also traces the critical response of the state to these processes.
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About the author

Shlomo Hasson is Associate Professor at Hebrew University and Senior Researcher at the Jerusalem Institute for Israeli Studies.

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Additional Information

Publisher
SUNY Press
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Published on
Feb 1, 2012
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Pages
198
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ISBN
9781438406060
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Middle East / Israel & Palestine
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • The first definitive history of the Mossad, Shin Bet, and the IDF’s targeted killing programs, hailed by The New York Times as “an exceptional work, a humane book about an incendiary subject.”

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