Biothermodynamics: The Role of Thermodynamics in Biochemical Engineering

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This book covers the fundamentals of the rapidly growing field of biothermodynamics, showing how thermodynamics can best be applied to applications and processes in biochemical engineering. It describes the rigorous application of thermodynamics in biochemical engineering to rationalize bioprocess development and obviate a substantial fraction of this need for tedious experimental work. As such, this book will appeal to a diverse group of readers, ranging from students and professors in biochemical engineering, to scientists and engineers, for whom it will be a valuable reference.
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Publisher
CRC Press
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Published on
May 30, 2013
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Pages
380
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ISBN
9781466582170
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Science / Biotechnology
Science / Chemistry / Industrial & Technical
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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