Marsilius of Padua at the Intersection of Ancient and Medieval Traditions of Political Thought

University of Toronto Press
Free sample

This book focuses on the reception of classical political ideas in the political thought of the fourteenth-century Italian writer Marsilius of Padua. Vasileios Syros provides a novel cross-cultural perspective on Marsilius’s theory and breaks fresh ground by exploring linkages between his ideas and the medieval Muslim, Jewish, and Byzantine traditions.

Syros investigates Marsilius’s application of medical metaphors in his discussion of the causes of civil strife and the desirable political organization. He also demonstrates how Marsilius’s demarcation between ethics and politics and his use of examples from Greek mythology foreshadow early modern political debates (involving such prominent political authors as Niccolò Machiavelli and Paolo Sarpi) about the political dimension of religion, church-state relations, and the emergence and decline of the state.

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About the author

Vasileios Syros is a Senior Research Fellow of the Academy of Finland at the Finnish Centre of Political Thought & Conceptual Change.

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Additional Information

Publisher
University of Toronto Press
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Published on
Dec 31, 2012
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Pages
320
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ISBN
9781442663886
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Europe / Medieval
Philosophy / Political
Political Science / History & Theory
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Praise for A Distant Mirror
 
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NOTE: This edition does not include color images.
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