Stone Birch: Betula ermanii

Institute of Volcanology and Seismology FEB RAS
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Stone birch (Betula ermanii) is being considered from the ecologist’s point of view. The phenomenological characteristic of the Kamchatka stone birch forests is presented. Some aspects of the wood, bark, sap, foliage, and buds’ usage in the commodity production, folk medicine and handicraft industry are unveiled. The role and the importance of the stone birch woods in the preservation of primary-natural structure of landscapes and ecosystems of the peninsula are underlined. Photos illustrate the distinctive nature of Kamchatka.
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About the author

Valery is a researcher at the Institute of Volcanology and Seismology FEB RAS based in Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky, Russia. He specializes in fields of geography and landscape science, ecology, economy, Kamchatka local lore. Author of over 100 scientific works and more than 150 popular publications that cover influence of volcanic activity upon landscapes and ecosystems, problems of nature management and regional economy, local history.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Institute of Volcanology and Seismology FEB RAS
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Published on
Mar 23, 2017
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Pages
160
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ISBN
9785425305114
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Language
English
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Genres
Nature / Ecosystems & Habitats / Forests & Rainforests
Nature / Plants / Trees
Science / Life Sciences / Botany
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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