Internet Lesbian and Gay Television Series, 1996–2014

McFarland
1
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Created around the world and available only on the Web, internet “television” series are independently produced, mostly low budget shows that often feature talented but unknown performers. Typically financed through crowd-funding, they are filmed with borrowed equipment and volunteer casts and crews, and viewers find them through word of mouth or by chance. The third of five volumes on Internet TV series, this book covers 335 alphabetically arranged gay and lesbian programs, 1996–2014, giving casts, credits, story lines, episode descriptions, websites, dates and commentary. A complete index lists program titles and headings for gay, lesbian, bi-sexual, transgender and drag queen shows.
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About the author

Vincent Terrace has worked as a researcher for ABC television and is the television historian for BPOLIN Productions (an independent film and television producing company for which he has created a projected television series called “April’s Dream”). He has written more than 30 books, many about television and radio.
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Additional Information

Publisher
McFarland
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Published on
Sep 1, 2015
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Pages
232
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ISBN
9781476621265
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Language
English
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Genres
Performing Arts / Television / General
Reference / Bibliographies & Indexes
Social Science / LGBT Studies / Gay Studies
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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The team behind the New York Times bestseller The Book of General Ignorance turns conventional biography on its head—and shakes out the good stuff.
 
Following their Herculean—or is it Sisyphean?—efforts to save the living from ignorance, the two wittiest Johns in the English language turn their attention to the dead.
 
As the authors themselves say, “The first thing that strikes you about the Dead is just how many of them there are.” Helpfully, Lloyd and Mitchinson have employed a simple—but ruthless—criterion for inclusion: the dead person has to be interesting.
 
Here, then, is a dictionary of the dead, an encyclopedia of the embalmed. Ludicrous in scope, whimsical in its arrangement, this wildly entertaining tome presents pithy and provocative biographies of the no-longer-living from the famous to the undeservedly and—until now—permanently obscure. Spades in hand, Lloyd and Mitchinson have dug up everything embarrassing, fascinating, and downright weird about their subjects’ lives and added their own uniquely irreverent observations.
 
Organized by capricious categories—such as dead people who died virgins, who kept pet monkeys, who lost limbs, whose corpses refused to stay put—the dearly departed, from the inventor of the stove to a cross-dressing, bear-baiting female gangster finally receive the epitaphs they truly deserve.
 
Discover:

* Why Freud had a lifelong fear of trains
* The one thing that really made Isaac Newton laugh
* How Catherine the Great really died (no horse was involved)
 
Much like the country doctor who cured smallpox (he’s in here), Lloyd and Mitchinson have the perfect antidote for anyone out there dying of boredom. The Book of the Dead—like life itself—is hilarious, tragic, bizarre, and amazing. You may never pass a graveyard again without chuckling.


From the Hardcover edition.
In the 1990s the big three networks were being challenged by upstarts FOX and the WB for viewer loyalty. Alongside must-see stalwarts like Frasier, Friends, and Seinfeld, the new networks introduced pop culture touchstones like Buffy the Vampire Slayer and The X-Files. Such shows not only made household names of their stars, but also thrived in syndication and some even graduated to the big screen. In that decade, shows such as ER, Everybody Loves Raymond, and Northern Exposure were vying for awards while programs like Beverly Hills, 90210 and Home Improvement drew in millions of viewers each week. Even after these shows departed the airwaves, they live on in syndication and on DVDs, entertaining many generations of viewers.

In Television Series of the 1990s: Essential Facts and Quirky Details, Vincent Terrace presents readers with a cornucopia of information about sixty programs from the decade. For example, did you know that Ally McBeal’s favorite brand of ice cream is Ben and Jerry’s? Or that Hank Hill’s shoe size is 12? Or that Carrie Bradshaw’s favorite cookie is Double-Stuff Oreos? These are just a handful of hundreds of fun and intriguing specifics found inside this volume. Programs from all of the major networks—as well as select syndicated programs and HBO—are represented here.

This is not a book of opinions or essays about specific television programs but a treasure trove of facts associated with each show. From Niles Crane’s I.Q score to George Constanza’s high score on Frogger, readers will discover a wealth of fascinating information that, for the most part, cannot be found elsewhere. In some cases, the factual data detailed herein is the only such documentation that currently exists on bygone shows of the era. Television Series of the 1990s is the ideal reference for fans of this decade and anyone looking to stump even the most knowledgeable trivia expert.
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