On Admiration: Heroes, Heroines, Role Models, and Mentors

Skyhorse
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The award-winning author of The Writing on the Wall celebrates the heroes and heroines who have inspired him throughout his life.
 
In a refreshing departure from today’s celebrity worship cultivated by reality television, tabloid photos, and social media, award-winning novelist W. D. Wetherell’s On Admiration celebrates the influential men and women who have peopled his life from his earliest years.
 
Writers, singers, presidents, athletes, cartoonists, artists, activists, and many more are examined here—from Henry David Thoreau to Willa Cather to Albert Camus to Dwight D. Eisenhower to Winston Churchill to Beverly Sills—in this humorous, insightful memoir that speaks powerfully about the state of fame, celebrity culture, and honest admiration.
 
Wetherell skillfully reminds us of the magic and mystery that comes with slow discovery—of that first awareness of those figures who awoke something within us, that inspired us as children, teenagers, and adults—forever altering the landscape of ourselves. From visiting Herman Melville’s study where Moby Dick was written to being a Rangers fan living in NYC—Wetherell examines the meaning of the American cultural landscape—and its remnants—in a candid and personal memoir like no other before him. With this lively and exacting series of pop culture essays, Wetherell joins the ranks of David Foster Wallace, Jonathan Franzen, and Chuck Klosterman.
 
“Wetherell’s is a voice of sanity and sense for our increasingly virtual age. Reading him is like coming home.” —San Francisco Chronicle
 
“A likable writer I have admired for a good many years.” —Edward Hoagland, author of In the Country of the Blind
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About the author

W. D. Wetherell is the author of eleven previous works of fiction & non-fiction. He has received two fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, two O. Henry Awards, the Drue Heinz Literature Prize, & most recently, the American Academy of Arts & Letters' Strauss Living Award. He lives in Lyme, New Hampshire.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Skyhorse
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Published on
Sep 21, 2010
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Pages
209
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ISBN
9781628731309
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Language
English
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Genres
Body, Mind & Spirit / Inspiration & Personal Growth
Self-Help / Motivational & Inspirational
Self-Help / Personal Growth / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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An analysis of works written during the Great War—while the fate of the world was still unknown—by W. B. Yeats, Edith Wharton, W. E. B. Du Bois, and others.
 
Since the hundredth anniversary of World War I, the literary canon of the war has consolidated around memoirs written in the years after the Armistice by soldier-writers who served in the trenches. Another kind of Great War literature has been almost entirely ignored: the books written and published during the war by the greatest English, American, French, and German writers at work—books that show us how the best, most influential writers responded to an overpowering human and cultural catastrophe.
 
Where Wars Go to Die: The Forgotten Literature of World War I explores this little-known cache of contemporary writings by the greatest novelists, poets, playwrights, and essayists of the war years, examining their interpretations and responses, weaving excerpts and quotations from their books into a narrative that focuses on the various ways civilian writers responded to an overwhelming historical reality.
 
The authors whose war writings are presented include George Bernard Shaw, Henry James, Joseph Conrad, H. G. Wells, Edith Wharton, Maurice Maeterlinck, Henri Bergson, W. E. B. Du Bois, Romain Rolland, Thomas Mann, Thomas Hardy, May Sinclair, W. B. Yeats, Ring Lardner, Reinhold Niebuhr, and dozens more of equal stature.
 
Intended for the general reader as much as the specialist, Where Wars Go to Die breaks important new ground in the history and literature of World War I.
#1 New York Times Bestseller

Over 1 million copies sold

In this generation-defining self-help guide, a superstar blogger cuts through the crap to show us how to stop trying to be "positive" all the time so that we can truly become better, happier people.

For decades, we’ve been told that positive thinking is the key to a happy, rich life. "F**k positivity," Mark Manson says. "Let’s be honest, shit is f**ked and we have to live with it." In his wildly popular Internet blog, Manson doesn’t sugarcoat or equivocate. He tells it like it is—a dose of raw, refreshing, honest truth that is sorely lacking today. The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F**k is his antidote to the coddling, let’s-all-feel-good mindset that has infected American society and spoiled a generation, rewarding them with gold medals just for showing up.

Manson makes the argument, backed both by academic research and well-timed poop jokes, that improving our lives hinges not on our ability to turn lemons into lemonade, but on learning to stomach lemons better. Human beings are flawed and limited—"not everybody can be extraordinary, there are winners and losers in society, and some of it is not fair or your fault." Manson advises us to get to know our limitations and accept them. Once we embrace our fears, faults, and uncertainties, once we stop running and avoiding and start confronting painful truths, we can begin to find the courage, perseverance, honesty, responsibility, curiosity, and forgiveness we seek.

There are only so many things we can give a f**k about so we need to figure out which ones really matter, Manson makes clear. While money is nice, caring about what you do with your life is better, because true wealth is about experience. A much-needed grab-you-by-the-shoulders-and-look-you-in-the-eye moment of real-talk, filled with entertaining stories and profane, ruthless humor, The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F**k is a refreshing slap for a generation to help them lead contented, grounded lives.

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