Blues All Day Long: The Jimmy Rogers Story

University of Illinois Press
2
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A member of Muddy Waters' legendary late 1940s-1950s band, Jimmy Rogers pioneered a blues guitar style that made him one of the most revered sidemen of all time. Rogers also had a significant if star-crossed career as a singer and solo artist for Chess Records, releasing the classic singles "That's All Right" and "Walking By Myself."

In Blues All Day Long, Wayne Everett Goins mines seventy-five hours of interviews with Rogers' family, collaborators, and peers to follow a life spent in the blues. Goins' account takes Rogers from recording Chess classics and barnstorming across the South to a late-in-life renaissance that included new music, entry into the Blues Hall of Fame, and high profile tours with Eric Clapton and the Rolling Stones. Informed and definitive, Blues All Day Long fills a gap in twentieth century music history with the story of one of the blues' eminent figures and one of the genre's seminal bands.
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About the author

Wayne Everett Goins is a professor of music and director of jazz at Kansas State University. He is author of Pat Metheny's Secret Story and co-author of Charlie Christian: Jazz Guitar's King of Swing.

"Goins gleans fresh facts and vivid memories from dozens of lively interviews to capture the energy and struggles of the Chicago Blues scene, from Maxwell Street to the Chess Records studios. . . . engrossing."--Booklist
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4.5
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Additional Information

Publisher
University of Illinois Press
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Published on
Aug 30, 2014
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Pages
416
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ISBN
9780252096495
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Composers & Musicians
Biography & Autobiography / General
Music / Genres & Styles / Blues
Music / Individual Composer & Musician
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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