Joe E. Brown: Film Comedian and Baseball Buffoon

McFarland
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As a young boy in the depths of the 1890s depression, Joe E. Brown had a job: making faces at the firemen on passing coal-burning trains so they would throw coal at him. As a child he also worked as a circus acrobat and newsboy. His inventiveness and spunk helped his family get through hard times but also fueled his fascination with entertainment, and he built up a repertoire of rubber-faced expressions and funny antics that would make his stage and screen work memorable. Baseball was a favorite pursuit in his life and thus a recurring theme in his films and skits. In this biography—the first on one of the top film comedians of the 1930s—the reader learns of Joe’s challenging childhood and how it prepared him for later screen roles, and how his love of baseball translated into screen successes. His early career in vaudeville is discussed, his work as a Broadway comedian in the Roaring Twenties, his road to movie stardom, and how he parlayed his love of sports into big hits like 1930’s Elmer the Great. The year 1935 gets its own chapter; its films are considered the pinnacle of Brown’s career, including Alibi Ike, Bright Lights and A Midsummer Night’s Dream. The final chapters reveal what happened after he left Warner Bros., including the bittersweet 1940s, when he entertained troops around the globe while mourning a son lost to the war. The book concludes with a comprehensive filmography of his features from 1928 to 1963.
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About the author

Wes D. Gehring is a distinguished professor of film at Ball State University and associate media editor for USA Today magazine, for which he also writes the column “Reel World.” He is the author of 37 film books, including biographies of James Dean, Carole Lombard, Steve McQueen, Robert Wise, Red Skelton and Charlie Chaplin.
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Additional Information

Publisher
McFarland
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Published on
Dec 24, 2014
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Pages
228
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ISBN
9780786483518
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / General
Performing Arts / Film / General
Sports & Recreation / Baseball / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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